Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-rq46b Total loading time: 0.418 Render date: 2022-11-30T15:32:49.629Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

14 - Conclusion and perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2012

Hervé Bourlard
Affiliation:
Idiap Research Institute, Martigny, Switzerland
Steve Renals
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh, UK
Steve Renals
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Hervé Bourlard
Affiliation:
Idiap Research Institute
Jean Carletta
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Andrei Popescu-Belis
Affiliation:
Idiap Research Institute, Martigny, Switzerland
Get access

Summary

Goals and achievements

Money has been spent. About 20 million Euros over six years through the European AMI and AMIDA projects, complemented by a number of satellite projects and national initiatives, including the large IM2 Swiss NSF National Center of Competence in Research. This book has provided a unique opportunity to review this research, and we conclude by attempting to make a fair assessment of what has been achieved compared to the initial vision and goals.

Our vision was to develop multimodal signal processing technologies to capture, analyze, understand, and enhance human interactions. Although we had the overall goal of modeling communicative interactions in general, we focused our efforts on enhancing the value of multimodal meeting recordings and on the development of real-time tools to enhance human interaction in meetings. We pursued these goals through the development of smart meeting rooms and new tools for computer-supported cooperative work and communication, and through the design of new ways to search and browse meetings.

The dominant multimodal research paradigm in the late 1990s was centered on the design of multimodal human-computer interfaces. In the AMI and AMIDA projects we switched the focus to multimodal interactions between people, partly as a way to develop more natural communicative interfaces for human-computer interaction. As discussed in Chapter 1, and similar to what was done in some other projects around the same time, our main idea was to put the computer within the human interaction loop (as explicitly referred to by the EU CHIL project), where computers are primarily used as a mediator to enhance human communication and collaborative potential.

This approach raised a number of major research challenges, while also offering application opportunities. Human communication is one of the most complex processes we know, characterized by fast, highly sensitive multimodal processing in which information is received and analyzed from multiple simultaneous inputs in real time, with little apparent effort.

Type
Chapter
Information
Multimodal Signal Processing
Human Interactions in Meetings
, pp. 232 - 237
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×