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12 - Physiology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2017

Alison Fiander
Affiliation:
Cardiff University
Baskaran Thilaganathan
Affiliation:
St George’s University London
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Summary

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Chapter
Information
MRCOG Part One
Your Essential Revision Guide
, pp. 423 - 462
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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du Plessis, A J. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the developing fetus. Clin Perinatol 2009;36:531–48.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Martin, C B. Normal fetal physiology and behavior, and adaptive responses with hypoxemia. Semin Perinatol 2008;32:239–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moore, K L, Persaud, T V N. The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology, 8th ed. St Louis: Saunders; 2007.Google Scholar
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