Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-t5pn6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-22T09:36:04.912Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

5 - Cities and Urban Life

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 July 2023

Linda Walton
Affiliation:
Portland State University
Get access

Summary

Cities that rose up around trade differed significantly from those built as political and ceremonial centers, as the earliest cities in China were. Cities that grew as centers of trade showcased the expansion of commerce and the maritime connections that helped to fuel the Song economic revolution. Commerce drove urbanization during the Northern Song as both domestic and foreign trade increased dramatically. The population of the Northern Song capital, Kaifeng, grew to around a million, and port cities such as Quanzhou along the southeast coast made room for communities of foreign merchants along with their native residents. Both literary accounts such as Memories of the Eastern Capital and the unique visual representation of city life in Spring Festival along the River richly portray diverse aspects of Song urban life: order and disorder, festivals and entertainment, access to goods and services, food supply and distribution, intermingling of different social classes and genders. The Khitan Liao, Tangut Xi Xia, and Jurchen Jin also established multiple capital cities as they formed centralized states and empires. In part these were modeled on Chinese cities, but archaeological and other evidence has shown that cities often served quite different purposes for nomadic pastoral peoples.

Type
Chapter
Information
Middle Imperial China, 900–1350
A New History
, pp. 120 - 142
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Cities and Urban Life
  • Linda Walton, Portland State University
  • Book: Middle Imperial China, 900–1350
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108355025.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Cities and Urban Life
  • Linda Walton, Portland State University
  • Book: Middle Imperial China, 900–1350
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108355025.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Cities and Urban Life
  • Linda Walton, Portland State University
  • Book: Middle Imperial China, 900–1350
  • Online publication: 20 July 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108355025.006
Available formats
×