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14 - Seher’s “Circle of Care” Model in Advancing Supported Decision Making in India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2021

Michael Ashley Stein
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School
Faraaz Mahomed
Affiliation:
Wits University
Vikram Patel
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Charlene Sunkel
Affiliation:
Global Mental Health Peer Network
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Summary

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is seen by the disability movement as the foundation for inclusion and for enabling independent living for persons with psychosocial disabilities. Acknowledging the need for legal reforms to realize supported decision making (SDM), this paper focuses more on the role of communities for supporting a person with psychosocial disabilities in decision making about various aspects of life. The chapter describes the design of Seher, working in low-income communities of Pune, India, as a model in the practice of inclusive community mental health. The “Circle of Care” practice within Seher is provided as illustrative of developing community support networks based on a person’s will and preference to foster inclusive actions in the community and to support the person in decision making. SDM however is not an all encompassing, or the one and only solution in terms of full human rights realization. All articles of the CRPD are relevant.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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