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28 - Enschede Fireworks Disaster

from Part Six - Case Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 May 2010

Yuval Neria
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Sandro Galea
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Fran H. Norris
Affiliation:
Dartmouth Medical School, New Hampshire
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Summary

The Enschede Fireworks disaster was not characterized by continuous reports in the media and speculations about possible toxic exposure. Early measures of fireworks-related elements and the blood and urine assessments prevented this kind of negative aftermath, which might have delivered additional stress for the survivors. The main objective of the studies after the fireworks disaster was to obtain relevant information on the adverse effects on health in the short-, intermediate-, and long-term for use by health care providers and policy makers. There are very few longitudinal comparative studies postdisaster where control subjects are assessed at more than one wave in the intermediate and long term. This chapter focuses on the main results of studies with respect to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health disturbances, physical problems, and predictors of disturbances that were of special interest. Several studies after disasters have examined postevent mental health services (MHS) utilization.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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