Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-dknvm Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-29T19:22:19.064Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

13 - Intermittent Explosive Disorder

from Section II - The Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 December 2017

Kate M. Scott
Affiliation:
University of Otago, New Zealand
Peter de Jonge
Affiliation:
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands
Dan J. Stein
Affiliation:
University of Cape Town
Ronald C. Kessler
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Mental Disorders Around the World
Facts and Figures from the World Mental Health Surveys
, pp. 182 - 194
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ahmed, A. O., Green, B. A., McCloskey, M. S., et al. (2010). Latent structure of intermittent explosive disorder in an epidemiological sample. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 44, 663–72.Google Scholar
Al-Hamzawi, A., Al-Diwan, J., Al-Hasnawi, S., et al. (2012). The prevalence and correlates of intermittent explosive disorder in Iraq. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 126, 219–28.Google Scholar
Axinn, W. G., Ghimire, D. J., Williams, N. E., et al. (2013). Gender, traumatic events, and mental health disorders in a rural Asian setting. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 54, 444–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Breslau, J., Miller, E., Jin, R., et al. (2011). A multinational study of mental disorders, marriage, and divorce. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 124, 474–86.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Busch, F. N. (2009). Anger and depression. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 15, 271.Google Scholar
Coccaro, E. F. (2012). Intermittent explosive disorder as a disorder of impulsive aggression for DSM-5. American Journal of Psychiatry, 169, 577–88.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coccaro, E. F., Kavoussi, R. J., Berman, M. E., et al. (1998). Intermittent explosive disorder-revised: development, reliability, and validity of research criteria. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 39, 368–76.Google Scholar
Coccaro, E. F., Lee, R., McCloskey, M. S. (2014a). Relationship between psychopathy, aggression, anger, impulsivity, and intermittent explosive disorder. Aggressive Behavior, 40, 526–36.Google Scholar
Coccaro, E. F., Lee, R., McCloskey, M. S. (2014b). Validity of the new A 1 and A 2 criteria for DSM-5 intermittent explosive disorder. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 55, 260–7.Google Scholar
Coccaro, E. F., Posternak, M. A., Zimmerman, M. (2005). Prevalence and features of intermittent explosive disorder in a clinical setting. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 66, 1478–227.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fanning, J. R., Meyerhoff, J. J., Lee, R., et al. (2014). History of childhood maltreatment in intermittent explosive disorder and suicidal behavior. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 56, 1017.Google Scholar
Fincham, D., Grimsrud, A., Corrigall, J., et al. (2009). Intermittent explosive disorder in South Africa: prevalence, correlates and the role of traumatic exposures. Psychopathology, 42, 92–8.Google Scholar
Haro, J. M., Arbabzadeh-Bouchez, S., Brugha, T. S., et al. (2006). Concordance of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) with standardized clinical assessments in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 15, 167–80.Google Scholar
Judge, T. A., Livingston, B. A., Hurst, C. (2012). Do nice guys – and gals – really finish last? The joint effects of sex and agreeableness on income. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 102, 390.Google Scholar
Kessler, R. C., Coccaro, E. F., Fava, M., et al. (2006). The prevalence and correlates of DSM-IV intermittent explosive disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 63, 669–78.Google Scholar
Kessler, R. C., Coccaro, E. F., Fava, M.,et al. (2012). The phenomenology and epidemiology of intermittent explosive disorder. In The Oxford Handbook of Impulse Control Disorders (eds. Grant, J. E. and Potenza, M. N.), pp. 149–64. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kessler, R. C., ÜstÜn, T. B. eds. (2008). The WHO World Mental Health Surveys: Global Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Mental Disorders. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Kulper, D. A., Kleiman, E. M., McCloskey, M. S., et al. (2015). The experience of aggressive outbursts in intermittent explosive disorder. Psychiatry Research, 225, 710–15.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., et al. (2011). 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
McKinney, C. M., Caetano, R., Ramisetty-Mikler, S., et al. (2009). Childhood family violence and perpetration and victimization of intimate partner violence: findings from a national population-based study of couples. Annals of Epidemiology, 19, 2532.Google Scholar
McLaughlin, K. A., Green, J. G., Hwang, I., et al. (2012). Intermittent explosive disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement. Archives of General Psychiatry, 69, 1131–9.Google Scholar
Moffitt, T., Caspi, A., Taylor, A., et al. (2010). How common are common mental disorders? Evidence that lifetime prevalence rates are doubled by prospective versus retrospective ascertainment. Psychological Medicine, 40, 899.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray-Close, D., Ostrov, J. M., Nelson, D. A., et al. (2010). Proactive, reactive, and romantic relational aggression in adulthood: measurement, predictive validity, gender differences, and association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 44, 393404.Google Scholar
Nickerson, A., Aderka, I. M., Bryant, R. A., et al. (2012). The relationship between childhood exposure to trauma and intermittent explosive disorder. Psychiatry Research, 197, 128–34.Google Scholar
Novaco, R. W. (2010). Anger and psychopathology. In International Handbook of Anger: Constituent and Concomitant Biological, Psychological, and Social Processes (eds. Potegal, M., Stemmler, G., and Spielberger, C.), pp. 465–97. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
O'Leary, K. D., Tintle, N., Bromet, E. J., et al. (2008). Descriptive epidemiology of intimate partner aggression in Ukraine. Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, 43, 619–26.Google Scholar
Ortega, A. N., Canino, G., Alegria, M. (2008). Lifetime and 12-month intermittent explosive disorder in Latinos. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 78, 133–9.Google Scholar
Rees, S., Silove, D., Verdial, T., et al. (2013). Intermittent explosive disorder amongst women in conflict affected Timor-Leste: associations with human rights trauma, ongoing violence, poverty, and injustice. PLoS One, 8, e69207.Google Scholar
Scott, K. M., Lim, C. C. W., Hwang, I., et al. (2016). The cross-national epidemiology of DSM-IV intermittent explosive disorder. Psychological Medicine, 46, 3161–72.Google Scholar
Song, L., Singer, M. I., Anglin, T. M. (1998). Violence exposure and emotional trauma as contributors to adolescents' violent behaviors. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 152, 531–6.Google Scholar
Takayanagi, Y., Spira, A. P., Roth, K. B., et al. (2014). Accuracy of reports of lifetime mental and physical disorders: results from the Baltimore Epidemiological Catchment Area Study. JAMA Psychiatry, 71, 273–80.Google Scholar
Tavris, C. (1989). Anger: The Misunderstood Emotion. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
Van Goozen, S. H., Fairchild, G., Snoek, H., et al. (2007). The evidence for a neurobiological model of childhood antisocial behavior. Psychological Bulletin, 133, 149.Google Scholar
Yexley, M., Borowsky, I., Ireland, M. (2002). Correlation between different experiences of intrafamilial physical violence and violent adolescent behavior. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 17, 707–20.Google Scholar
Yoshimasu, K., Kawakami, N. (2011). Epidemiological aspects of intermittent explosive disorder in Japan; prevalence and psychosocial comorbidity: findings from the World Mental Health Japan Survey 2002–2006. Psychiatry Research, 186, 384–9.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×