Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-59m7g Total loading time: 0.386 Render date: 2022-06-30T13:36:57.287Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

9 - Efficacy phrases in Early Modern English medical recipes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Martti Mäkinen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Irma Taavitsainen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Päivi Pahta
Affiliation:
University of Tampere, Finland
Get access

Summary

Introduction

This article will focus on passages in Early Modern English medical recipes that can be interpreted as validating remedies or as attempts to persuade the reader of their efficacy. Such phrases are usually found at the end of recipes, and there are some set formulae expressing the function of the passage, although free formulation is very common, especially in Early Modern English medical recipe collections. The aim of this article is to discuss earlier definitions of the efficacy phrase and to present variation in the use and formulation of functional passages between 1500 and 1700. The article investigates how advances in medicine and scientific thinking are reflected in the efficacy phrases and why such phrases persisted throughout this period.

What is an efficacy phrase?

Efficacy phrases (EPs) are passages in medical recipes that testify to the value or effectiveness of the end product: the medicine itself. The term efficacy statement was first used by Hunt in 1990. Such passages are usually dispensable: the ultimate function of a recipe is not altered by leaving the phrase out (C. Jones 1998: 199).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
7
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×