Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.37 Render date: 2022-05-18T14:36:11.280Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

7 - Code-switching in Early Modern English medical writing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 May 2011

Päivi Pahta
Affiliation:
University of Tampere
Irma Taavitsainen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Päivi Pahta
Affiliation:
University of Tampere, Finland
Get access

Summary

The Queens Closet Opened.

Incomparable Secrets in Physick, Chyrurgery, Preserving and Candying, &c. Which were presented to the QUEEN: By the most experienced Persons of the Times, many whereof were had in Esteem when she pleased to descend to private Recreations. Corrected and Revived, with many new and large Additions: together with three exact Tables.

Vivit post Funera Virtus.

LONDON, Printed for Obadiah Blagrave, at the Sign of the Black Bear in St. Pauls Church-yard, 1679.

Introduction

The Queens Closet Opened, one of the most popular seventeenth-century household handbooks first printed in 1655, is a collection of medical remedies, advice on preserves and culinary recipes claimed to be used in the royal household of Queen Henrietta Maria, the wife of King Charles I. On the title page, the anonymous author, W.M., describes the book in the usual persuasive market discourse of the period, promising the purchasers and readers access to the incomparable secrets of the aristocracy in diet and health. The target audience of the book was presumably the seventeenth-century general readership, particularly female readers in charge of similar concerns in their own households. What catches the eye of a researcher interested in multilingualism on this page is the lofty Latin sentence, Vivit post Funera Virtus, ‘virtue outlives death’. Both in terms of language choice and actual meaning, this sentence seems out of place in a small and relatively cheap-looking practically oriented English-language quarto volume which in all likelihood is intended for a non-Latinate readership and directs the reader to better health and pleasures and luxuries of life rather than to concerns of moral values.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×