Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-kfj7r Total loading time: 0.226 Render date: 2022-12-05T04:01:15.112Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Conclusion: What Has Been Learned

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2021

Kevin Albertson
Affiliation:
Manchester Metropolitan University
Mary Corcoran
Affiliation:
Keele University
Jake Phillips
Affiliation:
Sheffield Hallam University
Get access

Summary

In the Introduction we noted the distinction between privatisation and marketisation, and we argued that this book is necessary because criminal justice has been the site of marketisation to a greater extent than it has privatisation. Yet this concept of marketisation has been underexplored. The chapters in the book demonstrate the sheer scale of marketisation that has occurred in criminal justice in the UK. There is evidence that similar marketisation has occurred in other states around the world (Walby and Lippert, Chapter 8; Swirak, Chapter 6).

As this book demonstrates, there is a whole array of other means by which the market has been used to shape the delivery of experiences of criminal justice. The chapters in this book expose a range of modes of governance and accountability that are at play and demonstrate the ways in which marketisation has impacted on criminal justice at macro-, meso- and micro-levels. Importantly, they have shown what the impact of this has been on the broader field, the individuals working within those fields and the service users that are subjected to systems of power delivered in newly formed markets. In this concluding chapter we attempt to draw together some of the themes that run across the chapters and consider what the future might hold for criminal justice and marketisation.

The language of the market

Ironically, or perhaps not, the concepts of free markets, marketisation and privatisation have so well captured the public discourse, we must employ them in highlighting their problems (Corcoran, Chapter 1; Swirak, Chapter 6; Corcoran et al, Chapter 12). We may talk, for example, about costs and benefits, about innovation, responsibility and accountability. Thus, we critique marketisation on its own terms here: in costs and benefits (Corcoran, Chapter 1). Yet despite allowing the market to choose its own grounds on which it might be justified, there are significant problems with the model as currently realised, even on its own terms.

Competition and its discontents

One of the key themes to come out of these chapters is the importance and role of competition. While one would expect competition to be a key feature of marketised services, it is the implications that are of concern.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×