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Part III - Case Studies: borderlands and Social Exclusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2014

Paramjit S. Judge
Affiliation:
Guru Nanak Dev University, India
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Summary

How physical spaces turn into social spaces of exclusion is the main perspective of the third part of this volume. Owing to the Western origin of the concept of social exclusion, the absence of volatile border could be regarded as the main reason for overlooking marginalization in the development process of the population living along the borders. India has a volatile border with Pakistan. Two major wars and the contemporary situation of unabated terrorism being considered as acts of state and non-state agents in collusion has created conditions for exclusion of the border population. The border between Pakistan and India, including the line of control, extends from Jammu and Kashmir to Gujarat and covers four states. What is happening to these populations? They are victims of a hostile and volatile border. These people have limited choices of occupations and they face various kinds of deprivations. These case studies based on empirical investigations cover borderlands along the Indo-Pakistan border or the line of control in Punjab and Jammu and Kashmir. All the studies take a journey into the life lived by the border population after the construction of barbed-wire border by the Indian state in order to check terrorist infiltration. Chapters 11 and 12 are based on the empirical study of Borderbelt located in Punjab. Harpreet Kaur's study analyses the exclusion of border districts of Amritsar and Ferozepur in Punjab and its effects on the community that resides there. The research indicates the existence of an excluded population.

Type
Chapter
Information
Mapping Social Exclusion in India
Caste, Religion and Borderlands
, pp. 215 - 217
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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