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Chapter 4 - Setting Up the Urodynamic Equipment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 April 2020

Ranee Thakar
Affiliation:
Croydon University Hospital
Philip Toozs-Hobson
Affiliation:
Birmingham Women’s Hospital
Lucia Dolan
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital
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Summary

Urodynamic equipment varies in complexity and a range of urodynamics machines are available. The choice of system depends on operator requirements. The Buyers’ Guide: Urodynamic Systems by Centre for Evidence-Based Purchasing may help to inform choice [1,2].

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

NHS Purchasing and Supply Agency Centre for Evidence-based Purchasing. Buyers’ Guide: Urodynamic Systems. CEP08045. London; 2008. www.nbt.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/CEP09037.pdf. Accessed December 2009.Google Scholar
Gammie, A, Clarkson, B, Constantinou, C, et al. International Continence Society guidelines on urodynamic equipment performance. Neurourol Urodyn. 2014;33:370–9.Google Scholar
Abrams, P, Cardozo, L, Fall, M, et al. The standardisation of terminology of lower urinary tract function: report from the standardisation sub-committee of the International Continence Society. Neurourol Urodyn. 2002;21:167–78.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schäfer, W, Abrams, P, Liao, L, et al. Good urodynamic practices: uroflowmetry, filling cystometry, and pressure-flow studies. Neurourol Urodyn. 2002;21:261–74.Google Scholar
Rosier, PF, Schaefer, W, Lose, G, et al. International Continence Society Good Urodynamic Practices and Terms 2016: Urodynamics, uroflowmetry, cystometry, and pressure‐flow study. Neurourol Urodyn. 2017;36:1243–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Abrams, P, Damaser, MS, Niblett, P, et al. Air filled, including “air‐charged,” catheters in urodynamic studies: does the evidence justify their use?. Neurourol Urodyn. 2017;36:1234–42.Google Scholar
Chu, A. Dome set-up in urodynamics. Neurourol Urodyn. 2007;26:594.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. The Reuse of Medical Devices Supplied for Single Use Only. Device Bulletin DB2006(04). London: Department of Health; 2006. www.mhra.gov.uk/Publications/Safetyguidance/Device Bulletins/CON2024995.Google Scholar

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