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Chapter 8 - Ambulatory Urodynamic Monitoring

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 April 2020

Ranee Thakar
Affiliation:
Croydon University Hospital
Philip Toozs-Hobson
Affiliation:
Birmingham Women’s Hospital
Lucia Dolan
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital
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Summary

Conventional urodynamics (laboratory cystometry) is considered the ‘gold standard’ for measuring bladder function. However, it is a static short test, typically 20–30 minutes, and is considered ‘nonphysiological’. It involves rapid retrograde filling of the bladder in a laboratory setting, which does not always allow reliable reproduction of symptoms. Ambulatory urodynamic monitoring (AUM) relies on physiological bladder filling with natural stressors, including patient mobilisation over a longer time frame, to monitor bladder function which can then be directly compared to presenting symptoms. It is a useful additional test for women in whom conventional urodynamics fails to reproduce or explain the lower urinary tract symptoms of which they complain [1]. AUM is performed through a portable system which allows information to be recorded digitally, and downloaded and reviewed during or at the end of the test. The trace can then be expanded or compressed without loss of information.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). Urinary Incontinence: the management of urinary incontinence in women: CG171; 2013.Google Scholar
van Waalwick van Doorn, E, Anders, K, Khullar, V, et al. Standardisation of ambulatory urodynamic reporting: report of the Standardisation Sub-committee of the International Continence Society for Ambulatory Urodynamic Studies. Neurourol Urodyn. 2000;19:113–25.Google Scholar

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