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1 - Services and their management

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Alan Nankervis
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
Yuki Miyamoto
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
Ruth Taylor
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
John Milton-Smith
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
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Summary

Learning objectives

After studying this chapter, readers will be able to:

  • discuss the overall global significance of services

  • explain the concept, nature and structure of services

  • understand management concepts and theories

  • discuss the main issues associated with the strategic management of services.

Introduction

There are many texts that focus on the strategies, plans and operational functions associated with the management of particular industries and organisations. Others explore the application of management concepts in industry sectors such as agriculture and manufacturing, or analyse services from operational or marketing perspectives. However, few books have attempted to examine global services from a strategic management perspective, which combines all management functions within an integrated approach. The reasons for this neglect reflect the complex nature of services, their unclear boundaries and shifting structures, their ‘intangible’ outputs, the perceived social and economic significance of services, and their inherent resistance to the direct transfer of manufacturing models of management.

However, services can no longer be ignored, nor their proper management responsibilities be abrogated, due to their primacy in the economies of all developed, and most developing, countries in the world. It is apparent that there is a need for the development of a strategic management approach for this important sector of the global economy. Services have now supplanted both the primary (agriculture, mining) and the secondary (manufacturing) economic sectors, as a predominant tertiary sector.

Type
Chapter
Information
Managing Services , pp. 1 - 34
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

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