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Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Antidepressants

from Part II - Medication Reference Tables

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2021

Michael Cummings
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Stephen Stahl
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

References

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References

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References

Shulman, K. I., Herrmann, N., Walker, S. E. (2013). Current place of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the treatment of depression. CNS Drugs, 27, 789797.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Shulman, K. I., Herrmann, N., Walker, S. E. (2013). Current place of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the treatment of depression. CNS Drugs, 27, 789797.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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References

Shulman, K. I., Herrmann, N., Walker, S. E. (2013). Current place of monoamine oxidase inhibitors in the treatment of depression. CNS Drugs, 27, 789797.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kennedy, S. H. (1997). Continuation and maintenance treatments in major depression: the neglected role of monoamine oxidase inhibitors. J Psychiatry Neurosci, 22, 127131.Google ScholarPubMed
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