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7 - Templer

February 1952 to Early 1954

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2021

Karl Hack
Affiliation:
The Open University, Milton Keynes
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Summary

This chapter shows how Templer recognised that the MCP’s October 1951 Resolutions had shifted the strategic initiative to government, but also that it had increased the importance of winning ‘hearts and minds’. It shows how he increased both punishment and reward, and resettlement amenities and training to secure kills, until late in his term, but above all optimised the government, military and committee system, and the policy towards Orang Asli and the jungle. He created a better system and learning organisation, which in turn started to experiment with the big combined food control–Special Branch–military operations that would start to clear communist committees out of one area after another. The next chapter shows how that learning took off over 1953–4, providing a solution to the problem Briggs had not cracked: how to ‘clear’ areas. Rejecting both hagiographic and hateful accounts of Templer, it reveals the truth about the man, and about the perfecting of Malaya’s counterinsurgency apparatus and the constant refining of its recipe of ingredients.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Malayan Emergency
Revolution and Counterinsurgency at the End of Empire
, pp. 287 - 339
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Templer
  • Karl Hack, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Malayan Emergency
  • Online publication: 16 December 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139942515.008
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  • Templer
  • Karl Hack, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Malayan Emergency
  • Online publication: 16 December 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139942515.008
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Templer
  • Karl Hack, The Open University, Milton Keynes
  • Book: The Malayan Emergency
  • Online publication: 16 December 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139942515.008
Available formats
×