Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-zzcdp Total loading time: 0.294 Render date: 2021-11-30T18:10:00.689Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - Technical introduction to MRI

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 August 2009

Stephen Davis
Affiliation:
Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne
Marc Fisher
Affiliation:
National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Steven Warach
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health, Baltimore
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Since the first image of the human wrist was obtained by Paul Lauterbur in 1972, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed significantly to a stage where it has found applications to most of the speciality branches in medicine. In the last decade there has been a rapid development in gradient and RF coil technology and this has resulted in the implementation of fast imaging techniques such as echo planar imaging (EPI), on clinical imaging systems. It is now possible to acquire a single image of the brain in less than 50 ms using EPI. During this period, MR has been used for obtaining functional information about the different physiological processes in the brain, such as diffusion and perfusion. This has resulted in the development of newer techniques, with the MR systems being equipped with faster gradients. MRI has been used in the acute stroke setting over the past few years, due to the unique sensitivity of several new MRI techniques to rapidly detect cerebral ischemia. These new techniques include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and high-speed MR-angiography (MRA). In this chapter, we will briefly outline the basic physical principles of MRI, which will lay a foundation for the following chapters. A brief overview of the MR techniques that have been developed for investigating stroke patients is provided. It is assumed, however, that the reader is familiar with the basic physics of MRI.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×