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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2020

Marius R. Busemeyer
Affiliation:
Universität Konstanz, Germany
Julian L. Garritzmann
Affiliation:
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main
Erik Neimanns
Affiliation:
Max-Planck-Institut für Gesellschaftsforschung, Cologne
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A Loud but Noisy Signal?
Public Opinion and Education Reform in Western Europe
, pp. 327 - 360
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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