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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 May 2023

Peter Trudgill
Affiliation:
Université de Fribourg, Switzerland
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The Long Journey of English
A Geographical History of the Language
, pp. 166 - 176
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • References
  • Peter Trudgill, Université de Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Book: The Long Journey of English
  • Online publication: 25 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108954624.015
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  • References
  • Peter Trudgill, Université de Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Book: The Long Journey of English
  • Online publication: 25 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108954624.015
Available formats
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  • References
  • Peter Trudgill, Université de Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Book: The Long Journey of English
  • Online publication: 25 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108954624.015
Available formats
×