Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-7l5rh Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-24T13:06:24.161Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

3 - Mycenaean Greek Worship in Minoan Territory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2023

Hans Beck
Affiliation:
Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Germany
Julia Kindt
Affiliation:
University of Sydney
Get access

Summary

Reference in the Linear B record to deities of the later pantheon, for instance Poseidon, Zeus, and Hera, among others, vividly attests to the Mycenaean pedigree of Greek religion. This chapter suggests that the resonance with local place, so foundational a characteristic of Hellenic belief in later times, also derived from Mycenaean origins. To this end, Susan Lupack decodes the complicated helix of Minoan and Mycenaean religion, illustrating that Mycenaean religion evolved through appropriations from the Minoans. The artefacts retrieved from the tomb of the Griffin Warrior in Pylos showcase the creative Minoan–Mycenaean mix. Tracing the movement of Mycenaean peoples to Crete, the linguistic examination of the famous Room of the Chariot-Tablets from Knossos demonstrates how the first wave of arrivals predominantly practised the religion they had brought with them from their mainland homes. A second assemblage from Knossos from only ca. sixty years later shows that the Mycenaeans now not only made an effort to worship Minoan deities, but also lent a new guise to their gods and goddesses, relating them to, and embedding them in, the land of the Minoans.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aura Jorro, F. (1993) Diccionario Micénico, volume 2. Madrid.Google Scholar
Aura Jorro, F. (1999) Diccionario Micénico, volume 1. Madrid.Google Scholar
Beck, H. (2020) Localism and the Ancient Greek City-State. Chicago, Ill.Google Scholar
Bendall, L. M. (2007) Economics of Religion in the Mycenaean World: Resources Dedicated to Religion in the Mycenaean Palace Economy. Oxford.Google Scholar
Bennet, J. (1985) ‘The Structure of the Linear B Administration at Knossos’, American Journal of Archaeology 89, 231–49.Google Scholar
Bennet, J. (2007) ‘Representations of Power in Mycenaean Pylos: Script, Orality, Iconography’, in Lang, F., Reinholdt, C. and Weilhartner, J. (eds.) Stephanos Aristeios: Archäologische Forschungen zwischen Nil und Istros, Festschrift für Stefan Hiller zum 65. Geburstag. Vienna, 1122.Google Scholar
Bennet, J. (2008) ‘Now You See It, Now You Don’t!: The Disappearance of Linear A Script on Crete’, in Baines, J., Bennet, J. and Houston, S. (eds.) The Disappearance of Writing Systems: Perspectives on Literacy and Communication. London, 129.Google Scholar
Blackwell, N. G. (2014) ‘Making the Lion Gate Relief at Mycenae: Tool Marks and Foreign Influence’, American Journal of Archaeology 118, 451–88.Google Scholar
Blakolmer, F. (2007) ‘The Silver Battle Krater from Shaft Grave IV at Mycenae: Evidence of Fighting “Heroes” on Minoan Palace Walls at Knossos?’, in Morris, S. P. and Laffineur, R. (eds.) Epos: Reconsidering Greek Epic and Aegean Bronze Age Archaeology. Proceedings of the 11th International Aegean Conference, Los Angeles, UCLA, The J. Paul Getty Villa, 20–23 April 2006. Liège and Austin, Tex., 213–24.Google Scholar
Blakolmer, F. (2011) ‘Vom Thronraum in Knossos zum Löwentor von Mykene: Kontinuitäten in Bildkunst und Palastideologie’, in Blakolmer, F. et al. (eds.) Österreichische Forschungen zur Ägäischen Bronzezeit 2009. Vienna, 6380.Google Scholar
Blakolmer, F. (2016) ‘Il Buono, il Bruto, il Cattivo? Character, Symbolism and Hierarchy of Animals and Supernatural Creatures in Minoan and Mycenaean Iconography’, Creta Antica 17, 97183.Google Scholar
Blakolmer, F. (2019) ‘No Kings, No Inscriptions, No Historical Events? Some Thoughts on the Iconography of Rulership in Mycenaean Greece’, in Kelder, J. M. and Waal, W. J. I. (eds.) From ‘Lugal.gal’ to ‘Wanax’: Kingship and Political Organisation in the Late Bronze Age Aegean. Leiden, 4994.Google Scholar
Boardman, J. (1961) The Cretan Collection in Oxford: The Dictaean Cave and Iron Age Crete. Oxford.Google Scholar
Brecoulaki, H. et al. (2015) ‘An Unprecedented Naval Scene from Pylos: First Considerations’, in Brecoulaki, H., Davis, J. L. and Stocker, S. R. (eds.) Mycenaean Wall Painting in Context: New Discoveries, Old Finds Reconsidered. Athens, 257–87.Google Scholar
Brumfiel, E. M. (1995) ‘Hetarchy and the Analysis of Complex Societies: Comments’, Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 6, 125–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Burke, B. (2005) ‘Materialization of Mycenaean Ideology and the Ayia Triada Sarcophagus’, American Journal of Archaeology 109(3), 403–22.Google Scholar
Chadwick, J. (1977) ‘The Ionian Name’, in Kinzl, K. H. (ed.) Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean in Ancient History and Prehistory. Berlin, 106–09.Google Scholar
Chapin, A. P. (2011) ‘Gender and Coalitional Power in the Miniature Frescoes of Crete and the Cycladic Islands’, in Andreadaki-Vlazaki, M. and Papadopoulou, E. (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th International Cretological Congress (Khania 2006). Chania, 507–22.Google Scholar
Chapin, A. P. (2014) ‘Aegean Painting in the Bronze Age’, in Pollitt, J. J. (ed.) The Cambridge History of Painting in the Classical World. Cambridge, 165.Google Scholar
Cosmopoulos, M. B. (2015) ‘A Group of New Mycenaean Frescoes from Iklaina, Pylos’, in Brecoulaki, H., Davis, J. L. and Stocker, S. R. (eds.) Mycenaean Wall Painting in Context: New Discoveries, Old Finds Reconsidered. Athens, 245–55.Google Scholar
Crowther, C. (2000) ‘Dikte’, in MacGillivray, J. A., Driessen, J. and Sackett, L. H. (eds.) The Palaikastro Kouros: A Minoan Chryselephantine Statuette and its Aegean Bronze Age Context. Athens, 145–48.Google Scholar
Davis, J. L. and Bennet, J. (1999) ‘Making Mycenaeans: Warfare, Territorial Expansion, and Representations of the Other in the Pylian Kingdom’, in Laffineur, R. (ed.) Polemos: le contexte guerrier en Égée à l’Âge du Bronze. Liège and Austin, Tex., 105–20.Google Scholar
Davis, J. L. and Stocker, S. R. (2016) ‘The Lord of the Gold Rings: The Griffin Warrior of Pylos’, Hesperia 85(4), 627–55.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (1998–99) ‘Kretes and Iawones: Some Observations on the Identity of Late Bronze Age Knossians’, in Bennet, J. and Driessen, J. (eds.) A-na-qo-ta: Studies Presented to J.T. Killen. Salamanca, 83105.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2000) The Scribes of the Room of the Chariot Tablets at Knossos: Interdisciplinary Approach to the Study of a Linear B Deposit. Salamanca.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2003) ‘The Court Compounds of Minoan Crete: Royal Palaces or Ceremonial Centers?’, Athena Review 3, 5761.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2004) ‘The Central Court of the Palace at Knossos’, in Cadogan, G., Hatzaki, E. and Vasilakis, A. (eds.) Knossos: Palace, City, State (British School at Athens Studies 12). Athens, 7582.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2008) ‘Chronology of the Linear B Tablets’, in Duhoux, Y. and Davies, M. (eds.) A Companion to Linear B: Mycenaean Greek Texts and Their World. Louvain-la-Neuve, 6979.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2012a) ‘A Matrilocal House Society in Pre- and Protopalatial Crete?’, in Schoep, I., Tomkins, P. and Driessen, J. (eds.) Back to the Beginning. Reassessing Social and Political Complexity on Crete during the Early and Middle Bronze Age. Oxford, 358–83.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. (2012b) ‘Chercher la femme: Identifying Minoan Gender Relations in the Built Environment’, in Panagiotopoulos, D. and Günkel-Maschek, U. (eds.) Minoan Realities: Approaches to Images, Architecture, and Society in the Aegean Bronze Age. Louvain-la-Neuve, 141–63.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. and Farnoux, A. (1994) ‘Mycenaeans at Malia?’, Aegean Archaeology 1, 5464.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. and Fiasse, H. (2011) ‘Burning Down the House: Defining the Household of Quartier Nu at Malia Using GIS’, in Glowacki, K. T. and Vogeikoff-Brogan, N. (eds.) STEGA: The Archaeology of Houses and Households in Ancient Crete (Hesperia Suppl. 44). Princeton, N.J., 285–96.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. and Langohr, C. (2007) ‘Rallying around a “Minoan” Past: The Legitimation of Power during the Late Bronze Age’, in Parkinson, W. and Galaty, M. (eds.) Revisiting Mycenaean Palaces, New Interpretations of an Old Idea II. Los Angeles, Calif., 178–89.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. and Langohr, C. (2014) ‘Recent Developments in the Archaeology of Minoan Crete’, Pharos 20, 75115.Google Scholar
Driessen, J. and Macdonald, C. (1984) ‘Some Military Aspects in the Late Fifteenth and Early Fourteenth Centuries B.C.’, Annual of the British School at Athens 79, 4974.Google Scholar
Egan, E. C. and Brecoulaki, H. (2015) ‘Marine Iconography at the Palace of Nestor and the Emblematic Use of the Argonaut’, in Brecoulaki, H., Davis, J. L. and Stocker, S. R. (eds.) Mycenaean Wall Painting in Context: New Discoveries, Old Finds Reconsidered. Athens, 289309.Google Scholar
Evans, A. (1901) Mycenaean Tree and Pillar Cult and its Mediterranean Relations: With Illustrations from Recent Cretan Finds. London.Google Scholar
Evans, A. (1930) The Palace of Minos at Knossos, volume 3. London.Google Scholar
Firth, R. J. (2016) ‘Further Statistical Analysis of the Personal Names Used on Crete during the Late Bronze Age’, Minos 39, 379400.Google Scholar
Galanakis, Y., Tsitsa, E. and Günkel-Maschek, U. (2017) ‘The Power of Images: Re-examining the Wall Paintings from the Throne Room at Knossos’, Annual of the British School at Athens 112, 4798.Google Scholar
Galaty, M. (1999) Nestor’s Wine Cups: Investigating Ceramic Manufacture and Exchange in a Late Bronze Age Mycenaean State. Oxford.Google Scholar
Gesell, G. (1985) Town, Palace, and House Cult in Minoan Crete. Gothenburg.Google Scholar
Goodison, L. (2001) ‘From Tholos Tomb to Throne Room: Perceptions of the Sun in Minoan Ritual’, in Laffineur, R. and Hägg, R. (eds.) Potnia: Deities and Religion in the Aegean Bronze Age. Liège and Austin, Tex., 7788.Google Scholar
Goodison, L. (2004) ‘From Tholos Tomb to Throne Room: Some Considerations of Dawn Light and Directionality in Minoan Buildings’, in Cadogan, G., Hatzaki, E. and Vasilakis, A. (eds.) Knossos: Palace, City, State (British School at Athens Studies 12). Athens, 339–50.Google Scholar
Gulizio, J. (2011) ‘Mycenaean Religion at Knossos’. PhD thesis, University of Texas at Austin.Google Scholar
Gulizio, J. and Nakassis, D. (2014) ‘The Minoan Goddess(es): Textual Evidence for Minoan Religion’, in Nakassis, D., Gulizio, J. and James, S. (eds.) Ke-re-me-ja: Studies Presented to Cynthia W. Shelmerdine. Philadelphia, Penn., 115–28.Google Scholar
Gulizio, J., Pluta, K. and Palaima, T. G. (2001) ‘Religion in the Room of the Chariot Tablets’, in Hägg, R. and Laffineur, R. (eds.) Potnia: Deities and Religion in the Aegean Bronze Age. Proceedings of the 8th International Aegean Conference Göteborg, Göteborg University, 12–15 April 2000. Liège and Austin, Tex., 453–61.Google Scholar
Heywood, J. E. and Davis, B.. (2019) ‘Painted Larnakes of the Late Minoan III Period: Funerary Iconography and the Stimulation of Memory’, in Borgna, E. et al. (eds.) MNEME: 17th International Aegean Conference, Venice and Udine, 17–21 April 2018. Leuven, 703–07.Google Scholar
Hogarth, D. G. (1899–1900) ‘The Dictaean Cave’, Annual of the British School at Athens 6, 94116.Google Scholar
Killen, J. T. (1987) ‘Piety Begins at Home: Place-Names on Knossos Records of Religious Offerings’, in Ilievski, P. H. and Crepajac, I. (eds.) Tractata Mycenaea: Proceedings of the Eighth International Colloquium on Mycenaean Studies, Ohrid. Skopje, 163–77.Google Scholar
Knappett, C. (2016) ‘Minoanisation and Mycenaeanisation: A Commentary’, in Gorogianni, E., Pavuk, P. and Girella, L. (eds.) Beyond Thalassocracies: Understanding Processes of Minoanisation and Mycenaeanisation in the Aegean. Oxford, 202–06.Google Scholar
Knappett, C. and Schoep, I. (2000) ‘Continuity and Change in Minoan Palatial Power’, Antiquity 74, 365–71.Google Scholar
Kramer-Hajos, M. (2015) ‘Mourning on the Larnakes at Tanagra: Gender and Agency in Late Bronze Age Greece’, Hesperia 84, 627–67.Google Scholar
Kyriakidis, E. (2006) Ritual in the Bronze Age Aegean: The Minoan Peak Sanctuaries. London.Google Scholar
Lambrinoudakis, V. (1981) ‘Remains of the Mycenaean Period in the Sanctuary of Apollon Maleatas’, in Hagg, R. and Marinatos, N. (eds.) Sanctuaries and Cults in the Aegean Bronze Age. Stockholm, 5965.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2006) ‘Deities and Religious Personnel as Collectors’, in Perna, M. (ed.) Fiscality in Mycenaean and Near Eastern Archives. Naples, 89108.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2008) The Role of the Religious Sector in the Economy of Late Bronze Age Mycenaean Greece. Oxford.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2010) ‘Mycenaean Religion’, in Cline, E. H. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean (ca. 3000–1000 BCE). Oxford, 263–76.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2014) ‘Offerings for the Wanax in the Fr Tablets: Ancestor Worship and the Maintenance of Power in Mycenaean Greece’, in Nakassis, D., Gulizio, J. and James, S. (eds.) Ke-ra-me-ja: Studies Presented to Cynthia Shelmerdine. Philadelphia, Penn., 163–77.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2016) ‘Pu-ro, Pa-ki-ja-ne, and the Worship of an Ancestral Wanax’, in Alram-Stern, E. et al. (eds.) Metaphysis: Ritual, Myth, and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age. Liège and Austin, Tex., 537–41.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2020) ‘Continuity and Change in Cult from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age’, in Middleton, G. (ed.) Collapse and Transformation: The Late Bronze Age/Early Iron in the Aegean. Oxford, 161–67.Google Scholar
Lupack, S. (2021) ‘The Mycenaeans and Ecstatic Ritual Experience’, in Stein, D. L., Costello, S. K. and Foster, K. P. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Ecstatic Experience in the Ancient World. Abingdon, 284–295.Google Scholar
MacGillivray, J. A. (2000) ‘The Great Kouros in Cretan Art’, in MacGillivray, J. A., Driessen, J. and Sackett, L. H. (eds.) The Palaikastro Kouros: A Minoan Chryselephantine Statuette and Its Aegean Bronze Age Context. London, 123–30.Google Scholar
MacGillivray, J. A., Driessen, J. and Sackett, L. H. (eds.) (2000) The Palaikastro Kouros: A Minoan Chryselephantine Statuette and Its Aegean Bronze Age Context. London.Google Scholar
Maran, J. (2011) ‘Lost in Translation: The Emergence of Mycenaean Culture as a Phenomenon of Glocalization’, in Wilkinson, T. C., Sherratt, S. and Bennet, J. (eds.) Interweaving Worlds: Systemic Interactions in Eurasia, 7th to 1st Millennia BC. Oxford, 282–94.Google Scholar
Maran, J. and Stavrianopoulou, E. (2007) ‘Potnios Aner[Grk] ‒ Reflections on the Ideology of Mycenaean Kingship’, in Alram-Stern, E. and Nightingale, G. (eds.) Keimelion: The Formation of Elites and Elitist Lifestyles from Mycenaean Palatial Times to the Homeric Period. Akten des internationalen Kongresses vom 3. bis 5. Februar 2005 in Salzburg. Vienna, 285–98.Google Scholar
Morris, C. and Peatfield, A. (2002) ‘Feeling through the Body: Gesture in Cretan Bronze Age Religion’, in Hamilakis, Y., Pluciennik, M. and Tarlow, S. (eds.) Thinking through the Body: Archaeologies of Corporeality. New York, N.Y., 105–20.Google Scholar
Morris, C. and Peatfield, A. (2021) ‘Bodies in Ecstasy: Shamanic Elements in Minoan Religion’, in Stein, D. L., Costello, S. K. and Foster, K. P. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Ecstatic Experience in the Ancient World. Abingdon, 264–283.Google Scholar
Morris, S. P. (1989) ‘A Tale of Two Cities: The Miniature Frescoes from Thera and the Origins of Greek Poetry’, American Journal of Archaeology 93, 511–35.Google Scholar
Nagy, G. (2015) ‘From Athens to Crete and Back’, in Classical Inquiries: Studies on the Ancient World from the Center for Hellenic Studies. Cambridge, Mass. Available at https://classical-inquiries.chs.harvard.edu/from-athens-to-crete-and-back/#sdfootnote4sym.Google Scholar
Nakassis, D., Galaty, M. L. and Parkinson, W. A. (2010) ‘State and Society’, in Cline, E. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of the Bronze Age Aegean. Oxford, 239–50.Google Scholar
Nilsson, M. (1927) The Minoan-Mycenaean Religion and Its Survival in Greek Religion. Lund.Google Scholar
Palaima, T. G. (1995) ‘The Nature of the Mycenaean Wanax: Non-Indo-European Origins and Priestly Functions’, in Rehak, P. (ed.) The Role of the Ruler in the Prehistoric Aegean. Liège and Austin, Tex., 119–39.Google Scholar
Palaima, T. G. (2004) ‘Sacrificial Feasting in the Linear B Documents’, in Wright, J. C. (ed.) The Mycenaean Feast. Princeton, N.J., 217–46.Google Scholar
Palaima, T. G. (2008) ‘Mycenaean Religion’, in Shelmerdine, C. W. (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to the Aegean Bronze Age. Cambridge, 342–61.Google Scholar
Peatfield, A. (1994) ‘After the “Big Bang” – What? or Minoan Symbols and Shrines beyond Palatial Collapse’, in Alcock, S. E. and Osborne, R. (eds.) Placing the Gods: Sanctuaries and Sacred Space in Ancient Greece. Oxford, 1936.Google Scholar
Persson, A. (1942) The Religion of Greece in Prehistoric Times. Berkeley, Calif.Google Scholar
Preston, L. (1999) ‘Mortuary Practices and the Negotiation of Social Identities at LM II Knossos’, Annual of the British School at Athens 94, 131–43.Google Scholar
Preston, L. (2004) ‘A Mortuary Perspective on Political Changes in Late Minoan II–IIIB Crete’, American Journal of Archaeology 108, 321–48.Google Scholar
Rehak, P. (1995) ‘Enthroned Figures in Aegean Art and the Function of the Mycenaean Megaron’, in Rehak, P. (ed.) The Role of the Ruler in the Prehistoric Aegean. Liège and Austin, Tex., 95117.Google Scholar
Romano, D. G. and Voyatzis, M. E. (2014) ‘Mt Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project, Part 1: The Upper Sanctuary’, Hesperia 83, 569652.Google Scholar
Schoep, I. (2006) ‘Looking beyond the First Palaces’, American Journal of Archaeology 110, 3764.Google Scholar
Schoep, I. (2010) ‘The Minoan “Palace-Temple” Reconsidered: A Critical Assessment of the Spatial Concentration of Political, Religious and Economic Power in Bronze Age Crete’, Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 23, 219–43.Google Scholar
Schoep, I. (2018) ‘Building the Labyrinth: Arthur Evans and the Construction of Minoan Civilization’, American Journal of Archaeology 122, 532.Google Scholar
Schoep, I. and Knappett, C. (2004) ‘Dual Emergence: Evolving Hetarchy, Exploding Hierarchy’, in Barrett, J. C. and Halstead, P. (eds.) The Emergence of Civilization Revisited. Oxford, 2137.Google Scholar
Shelmerdine, C. W. (1985) The Perfume Industry of Mycenaean Pylos. Gothenburg.Google Scholar
Shelmerdine, C. W. (1999) ‘Administration in the Mycenaean Palaces: Where’s the Chief?’, in Galaty, M. L. and Parkinson, W. A. (eds.) Rethinking Mycenaean Palaces: New Interpretations of an Old Idea. Los Angeles, Calif., 1924.Google Scholar
Shelmerdine, C. W. (2016) ‘Poseidon, Pa-ki-ja-na, and Horse-Taming Nestor’, in Alram-Stern, E. et al. (eds.) Metaphysis: Ritual, Myth, and Symbolism in the Aegean Bronze Age. Liège and Austin, Tex., 275–83.Google Scholar
Stocker, S. R. and Davis, J. L. (2017) ‘The Combat Agate from the Grave of the Griffin Warrior at Pylos’, Hesperia 86(4), 583605.Google Scholar
Thorne, S. (2000) ‘Diktaian Zeus in Later Greek Tradition’, in MacGillivray, J. A., Driessen, J. and Sackett, L. H. (eds.) The Palaikastro Kouros: A Minoan Chryselephantine Statuette and Its Aegean Bronze Age Context. London, 149–62.Google Scholar
Tyree, E. L. (2013) ‘Defining Bronze Age Ritual in Caves in Crete’, in Mavridis, F. and Jensen, J. T. (eds.) Stable Places and Changing Perceptions: Cave Archaeology in Greece. Oxford, 176–87.Google Scholar
Ventris, M. and Chadwick, J. (1973) Documents of Mycenaean Greek, second ed. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Wace, A. J. B. (1973) ‘Foreword’, in Ventris, M. and Chadwick, J. (eds.) Documents of Mycenaean Greek. Cambridge, xxixxiv.Google Scholar
Warren, P. (1979) ‘The Miniature Fresco from the West House at Akrotiri, Thera, and its Aegean Setting’, The Journal of Hellenic Studies 99, 115–29.Google Scholar
Warren, P. (1988) Minoan Religion as Ritual Action. Gothenburg.Google Scholar
Warren, P. (2001) ‘Review of The Troubled Island: Minoan Crete before and after the Santorini Eruption by Jan Driessen and Colin MacDonald’, American Journal of Archaeology 105, 115–18.Google Scholar
Whittaker, H. (2014) Religion and Society in Middle Bronze Age Greece. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Wright, J. C. (1987) ‘Death and Power at Mycenae: Changing Symbols in Mortuary Practice’, in Laffineur, R. (ed.) Thanatos: les coutumes funèraires en Egèe à l’Age du Bronze. Actes du colloque de Liège, 21–23 avril 1986. Liège and Austin, Tex., 171–84.Google Scholar
Wright, J. C. (1994) ‘The Spatial Configuration of Belief: The Archaeology of Mycenaean Religion’, in Alcock, S. E. and Osborne, R. (eds.) Placing the Gods: Sanctuaries and Sacred Space in Ancient Greece. Oxford, 3778.Google Scholar
Wright, J. C. (2004) ‘A Survey of Evidence for Feasting in Mycenaean Society’, in Wright, J. C. (ed.) The Mycenaean Feast. Princeton, N.J., 133–78.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×