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Chapter 27 - Pupils

Liszt as Teacher

from Part IV - Reception and Legacy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2021

Joanne Cormac
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
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Summary

On a sunny afternoon in the music room of the Hofgärtnerei in Weimar, seven pianists carried out a rite that had naturally crystalized over the last decades: from a pile of scores stacked atop one of two grand pianos, Franz Liszt selected works by Robert Schumann, Fryderyk Chopin, Anton Rubinstein, Jean Louis Nicodé and himself to hear that day. Those compositions had been offered by Emil von Sauer, Maximillian van der Sandt, Alexander Lambert, Georg Liebling, Louis Marek and Augusta Fischer, who in turn played them before Liszt and their peers. For the most part, the seventy-two-year-old master was pleased with the hearings. His student August Göllerich noted how Liszt conducted along while Marek played the Meyerbeer-Liszt Illustrations de l’Africaine, grimaced playfully throughout Lambert’s performance of Rubinstein’s Fourth Piano Concerto and played through almost the whole of Chopin’s third Ballade, during which ‘he exquisitely caricatured the manner in which [the first] theme is played in the conservatories!’1

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Liszt in Context , pp. 249 - 257
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Pupils
  • Edited by Joanne Cormac, University of Nottingham
  • Book: Liszt in Context
  • Online publication: 23 September 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108378253.032
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Pupils
  • Edited by Joanne Cormac, University of Nottingham
  • Book: Liszt in Context
  • Online publication: 23 September 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108378253.032
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Pupils
  • Edited by Joanne Cormac, University of Nottingham
  • Book: Liszt in Context
  • Online publication: 23 September 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108378253.032
Available formats
×