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The Beilinson conjectures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2009

J. Coates
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
M. J. Taylor
Affiliation:
University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology
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Summary

Introduction

The Beilinson conjectures describe the leading coefficients of L-series of varieties over number fields up to rational factors in terms of generalized regulators. We begin with a short but almost selfcontained introduction to this circle of ideas. This is possible by using Bloch's description of Beilinson's motivic cohomology and regulator map in terms of higher Chow groups and generalized cycle maps. Here we follow [Bl3] rather closely. We will then sketch how much of the known evidence in favour of these conjectures — to the left of the central point — can be obtained in a uniform way. The basic construction is Beilinson's Eisenstein symbol which will be explained in some detail. Finally in an appendix a map is constructed from higher Chow theory to a suitable Ext-group in the category of mixed motives as defined by Deligne and Jannsen. This smooths the way towards an interpretation of Beilinson's conjectures in terms of a Deligne conjecture for critical mixed motives [Sc2]. It also explains how work of Harder [Ha2] and Anderson fits into the picture.

For further preliminary reading on the Beilinson conjectures, one should consult the Bourbaki seminar of Soulé [Sol], the survey article by Ramakrishnan [Ra2] and the introductory article by Schneider [Sch]. For the full story see the book [RSS] and of course Beilinson's original paper [Bel]. Here one will also find the conjectures for the central and near-central points, which for brevity we have omitted here.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1991

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