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22 - Writing and Good Language Teachers

from Part III - Instructional Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
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Summary

In Chapter 22, the authors describe the beliefs and practices of writing teachers. They employed interviews to identify the principles and practices that teachers consider to be crucial features of good writing teachers.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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