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General Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2023

Kevin Corrigan
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Emory University, Atlanta
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A Less Familiar Plato
From Phaedo to Philebus
, pp. 309 - 322
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

General Bibliography

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