Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-dfw9g Total loading time: 0.35 Render date: 2022-08-11T17:05:04.521Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

4 - Understanding the Earliest Bishops of Worcester c. 660–860

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

Allan Scott McKinley
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Get access

Summary

WORCESTER is the best evidenced of all the early Anglo-Saxon bishoprics, with a substantial collection of material on which to construct narratives. yet this has rarely been done, perhaps because of the difficulty of ascertaining which charters are reliable. This is a pity, for Worcester is unparalleled in the opportunities it presents to scholars seeking to understand the development of a church and its relationship with its landscape. The way in which the bishops of Worcester built up the power of their church can be at least dimly discerned in this material, and the effort of determining how the bishops did this and in what circumstances is worthwhile, as it presents an alternative perspective on parts of Anglo-Saxon history where existing narratives are focused on secular leaders, not churchmen.

A key problem with studying the early bishops of Worcester is that they are faceless historical individuals; unlike the other subjects of this volume, the predecessors of Bishop Wærfrith (see Table 4.1) have not left a legacy of writings or controversies but, at most, a few charters which, in the current state of knowledge, may tell us more about the donors than the bishops. Understanding individual bishops' roles in history and contextualizing their few identifiable actions is, therefore, nigh on impossible. But this is not to say that there is nothing to be gained through study of those who led the episcopal church of Worcester through its first two centuries: what might appear as isolated and unconnected facts about members of the Worcester episcopate can, when the bishops are studied as a group, reveal interesting patterns.

Type
Chapter
Information
Leaders of the Anglo-Saxon Church
From Bede to Stigand
, pp. 77 - 96
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×