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22 - Late Triassic North American halobiid bivalves: diversity trends and circum-Pacific correlations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2009

J. M. Dickins
Affiliation:
Australian Geological Survey Organisation, Canberra
Yang Zunyi
Affiliation:
China University of Geosciences, Wukan
Yin Hongfu
Affiliation:
China University of Geosciences, Wukan
S. G. Lucas
Affiliation:
New Mexico Museum of Natural History
S. K. Acharyya
Affiliation:
Geological Survey of India
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Summary

By virtue of its fades independence, widespread distribution, and high species turnover, the late Triassic pteriid bivalve Halobia has been of considerable importance for correlating marine strata throughout much of the Upper Triassic. The age significance and taxonomy of Halobia and its thin-shelled cousin Daonella were established largely by the classic monographs of Mojsisovics (1874), Gemmellaro (1882), and Kittl (1912) describing material from the Hallstatt facies of the Austrian Salzkammergut and from Sicily. Today, Halobia from the Alpine-Mediterranean region continues to play a major role in the construction of a biochronology of the Upper Triassic, as seen in recent works by Gruber (1976), Cafiero and De Capoa Bonardi (1982), and De Capoa Bonardi (1984).

The early success in establishing the age significance of Halobia in Europe was quickly repeated along the Pacific margins following the discovery of Halobia in New Zealand (Hochstetter, 1863; Trechmann, 1918) and North America (Gabb, 1864). After the initial discovery of Halobia in the Pacific margin, significant occurrences were documented from Timor (Krumbeck, 1924) and North America (Smith, 1927). A large number of studies revealing the extent and diversity of circum-Pacific Halobia appeared in the middle part of the twentieth century because of the efforts of T. Kobayashi (Japan and Southeast Asia), Chen-Chu Chen (China), and I. Polubotko (Russia) and their colleagues.

Throughout the circum-Pacific, Halobia continues to play an important role in correlating Carnian–middle Norian marine strata.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

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