Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-jcfbx Total loading time: 0.464 Render date: 2022-01-25T21:38:02.540Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

8 - Hand-preference and population schizotypy:

A meta-analysis

from Section 2 - Language lateralization and psychosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2009

Iris E. C. Sommer
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
René S. Kahn
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

Hand preference in population schizotypy, however, has been investigated extensively in large samples. In order to elucidate the evidence for a possible association between hand preference and schizotypal tendency, this chapter explores the meta-analyses on the present literature. Primarily, the chapter investigates whether schizotypy is elevated in non-right-handers in comparison to right-handers. Secondarily, it also investigates whether there is a difference between mixed handedness (ambidexterity) in comparison to both strong right and left handedness. Hand preference can be dichotomously dissected in right-handedness (RH) and non-right-handedness (NRH), with non-right-handedness including left- (LH), mixed- (mix) and even weak right-hander or hand preference can be considered a trichotomous model comprising right-, mixed- and left-handedness. The homogeneity statistic was calculated to assess heterogeneity of results across studies. Neuroimaging studies on cerebral lateralization of high schizotypy subjects are required to elucidate the origins of the relation between NRH and schizotypy.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×