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7 - Syntax

from Part II - Language Structure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2019

Sungdai Cho
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Binghamton
John Whitman
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
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Summary

Chapter 7 deals with syntax proper. In this chapter, we discuss Category 2 (verbal and adjectival) formation, basic sentence structure, and the passive and causative patterns. We describe five basic patterns of predication: verbal predicates, adjectival predicates, nominal (copular) predicates, auxiliaries, and irregular predicates. We begin with basic sentence patterns, then introduce “scrambling” phenomena (that is, variations in word order), clausal embedding, and other complex sentence patterns. For both passive and causative constructions, we describe the basic shape of the patterns, the three-way distinction of lexical, morphological, and syntactic passives and causatives, and major syntactic characteristics of each. As with lexical passives, lexical causatives are underived. Morphological causatives involve seven allomorphs, four homophonous with the suffixes of the morphological passive. We survey the four patterns of syntactic causatives, and explain the major syntactic differences between morphological and syntactic causatives. We show that from an areal/typological perspective, Korean fits the North Asian pattern of primarily causativizing (transitivizing) languages.

Type
Chapter
Information
Korean
A Linguistic Introduction
, pp. 190 - 244
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Further Readings

Kang, Hyun-Hwa. 1998. Kwukeuy Tongsayenkeyl Kwusengey Kwanhan Yekkwu [Research on Korean Verbal Connectives]. Seoul: Hankuk Publisher.Google Scholar
Ko, Yong-Kun and Ki-Sim, Nam. 2003. Phyocwun Kwuke Muspeplon [Standard Korean Grammar]. Seoul: Thap Publishing.Google Scholar
Ko, Yong-Kun and Pon-Kwan, Ku. 2008. Wulimal Munpeplon [Korean Grammar].Phacwu-si: Cipmundang.Google Scholar
Lee, Ki-Gap. 1991. Hankwuke Eswun Yeynkwusa [Research on Korean Word Order]. Seoul: Seoul National University Press.Google Scholar
Nam, Ki-Shim. 2010. Hyentay Kwuke Tongsalon [Modern Korean Syntax], 4th ed. Seoul: Taehaksa.Google Scholar
Nam, Ki-Shim and Ko, Young-Kun. 2013. Pyocwun Kwuke Mwunpeplon [Grammar of Standard Korean], 3rd ed. Seoul: TOP Publisher.Google Scholar
Park, Jeong-Woon. 1992. The Korean morphological causative and passive. Korea Journal 32 (3): 4459.Google Scholar
Shibatani, Masayoshi. 1985. Passives and related constructions: A prototype analysis. Language 61: 821848.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siewierska, Anna. 1984. The Passive: A Comparative Linguistic Analysis. London: Croom Helm.Google Scholar
Sohn, Ho-min. 1999. The Korean Language. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
You, Hyun-Kyung. 1998. Kwuke Hyengyongsa Yenkwu [Research on Korean Adjectives]. Seoul: Hankuk Publisher.Google Scholar

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  • Syntax
  • Sungdai Cho, State University of New York, Binghamton, John Whitman, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Korean
  • Online publication: 14 November 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139048842.008
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  • Syntax
  • Sungdai Cho, State University of New York, Binghamton, John Whitman, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Korean
  • Online publication: 14 November 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139048842.008
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Syntax
  • Sungdai Cho, State University of New York, Binghamton, John Whitman, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Korean
  • Online publication: 14 November 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781139048842.008
Available formats
×