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5 - Consuls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Maïa Pal
Affiliation:
Oxford Brookes University
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Summary

Chapter 5 concerns the practices of Dutch, French, and English consuls in the Mediterranean and illustrates jurisdictional collaboration and conflict between sovereigns, merchants, trading companies, and regional institutions. It discusses the range of consuls' jurisdictional functions, the policies and strategies developed, such as the restrictive regulations increasingly put in place for the French service and its unique model of salaried and commissioned consuls, as well as the different practices found in Christian and non-Christian parts of the Mediterranean. Through a selection of archive material regarding events in the French embassy in Constantinople from the 1660s to 1680s, the analysis reveals a more interdependent relation between ambassadors and consuls in shaping extraterritorial and jurisdictional spaces. Focusing on class differences and social origins emphasises the role of consular diplomacy, its connection to the aristocratisation of ambassadorial diplomacy, and the development of different forms of early modern mercantilism. French consular practices are better categorised as transplants of authority, in contrast to the less jurisdictionally autonomous role of English and Dutch consular attempts to transport their sovereign’s authority.

Type
Chapter
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Jurisdictional Accumulation
An Early Modern History of Law, Empires, and Capital
, pp. 194 - 236
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Consuls
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.006
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  • Consuls
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Consuls
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.006
Available formats
×