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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2019

Ariel Glucklich
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
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The Joy of Religion
Exploring the Nature of Pleasure in Spiritual Life
, pp. 220 - 244
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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