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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2022

Eric Reid Lindstrom
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University of Vermont
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Jane Austen and Other Minds
Ordinary Language Philosophy in Literary Fiction
, pp. 264 - 277
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Bibliography
  • Eric Reid Lindstrom, University of Vermont
  • Book: Jane Austen and Other Minds
  • Online publication: 04 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009206976.010
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  • Bibliography
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  • Book: Jane Austen and Other Minds
  • Online publication: 04 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009206976.010
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