Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.236 Render date: 2021-12-01T22:24:21.315Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

6 - Austen's Readers I: Affection and Appropriation

from Part Two

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2012

Get access

Summary

Although discussion of Austen's earliest readers, in the shape of her family and immediate circle of friends, has already informed the argument of this book thus far, we will begin our detailed analysis of Austen's individual readers with the first generation of her literary successors, primarily with female authors, as these are the readers for whom the kinds of questions, problems and issues outlined in the previous chapters are most pressing. Austen's female successors frequently needed to establish themselves, as readers and writers, in opposition to the kinds of stereotypes and clichés discussed in Chapters 1 and 5. This chapter and those following discuss the implications of writers' various interactions with Austen's name in establishing their literary identities. As we will see, over the course of the long nineteenth century, Jane Austen became the publicly acceptable face of the woman writer, and, as literary women, writers from Mary Russell Mitford to Katherine Mansfield and Virginia Woolf compared themselves to Austen. They were also aware of the ways in which they were both implicitly and explicitly compared to her. Their reactions to her reveal important truths, not only about the ways in which Austen's novels acted on her successors, but about those successors' fears, insecurities and doubts about their position in the literary marketplace, their duties as professional women writers, and their responsibilities as women. Their negotiations with Austen's name show up their priorities as readers and writers, manifested in discussions over the characteristics of great literature, the proper behaviour for a professional female writer, the importance of a female tradition, the value of emotional responses, and debates about what a novel should be.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Anthem Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×