Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-pjpqr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T07:39:59.920Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2020

George Parsons
Affiliation:
London Seminary
Robert Sholl
Affiliation:
Royal Academy of Music, London
Get access

Summary

Writing in Sir James MacMillan’s 60th birthday year, it is fitting to present the first collection of essays devoted to his music. MacMillan first attracted international attention with the orchestral work The Confession of Isobel Gowdie, given its premiere at the 1990 Proms by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra under Jerzy Maksimiuk. This was followed by the 1992 percussion concerto Veni, Veni, Emmanuel, commissioned for the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, and given its premiere by Evelyn Glennie at the 1992 Proms. Other major works followed these two initial successes through the 1990s and included three works commissioned by Mstislav Rostropovich and the London Symphony Orchestra (The World’s Ransoming, the Cello Concerto and the Symphony, ‘Vigil’); the cantata Seven Last Words from the Cross (1993), which was screened on BBC TV during Holy Week in 1994; concertos for Clarinet (Ninian) and Trumpet (Epiclesis); Piano (The Beserking); and Quickening for chorus and orchestra, receiving its premiere at the 1999 Proms by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, and The Hilliard Ensemble, conducted by Andrew Davis. Since the year 2000 MacMillan has produced a string of concertos written for major international soloists, including Jean-Yves Thibaudet (Piano Concerto No. 3); the organist Wayne Marshall (A Scotch Bestiary); violinist Vadim Repin; oboist Nicholas Daniel; violist Lawrence Power; percussionist Colin Currie (Percussion Concerto No. 2); and trombonist Jörgen van Rijen.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×