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Chapter 12 - The Development of In-Vitro Fertilization in Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 June 2018

Gabor Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash University, Victoria
Peter Brinsden
Affiliation:
Bourn Hall Clinic, Cambridge
Alan DeCherney
Affiliation:
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda
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In-Vitro Fertilization
The Pioneers' History
, pp. 104 - 110
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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