Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-m8s7h Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-21T05:27:20.117Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

1 - Function to origin: national identity and national genius emerge, c. 1700–1780

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Matthew Gelbart
Affiliation:
Boston College, Massachusetts
Get access

Summary

If an average Lowland Scottish gentleman were approached around 1700 and asked to play “One of these things is not like the others” with the list of tunes I presented in my Introduction, he would almost certainly have singled out neither of the two pieces we might choose today – not the French air (the only piece from outside of Scotland) and not the fiddle dance (arguably the only real “folk” tune in modern parlance). Instead, he would probably pick the bagpipe pibroch. He would most likely find this bagpipe music extremely foreign, even strange (whereas he might well know a version of the Lully tune, which circulated around Europe in different forms). Even in the unlikely event that this particular Lowland gentleman just happened to possess enough Highland connections to have a passing familiarity with the pibroch genre and its stylized ornaments and repetitions, he would probably still consider the bagpipe piece the odd one out. Unlike the other two melodies, the pibroch was an occasional piece with a rigid set of performance rules, and it did not lend itself to dancing. In other words: for the purpose of categorizing the pieces, the Lowland gentleman would not really care who wrote them, or even where they came from. He would want to know how they functioned, how they were being used in a specific circumstance.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Invention of 'Folk Music' and 'Art Music'
Emerging Categories from Ossian to Wagner
, pp. 14 - 39
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×