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Chapter 6 - Vascular malformations of the brain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2010

J. Ricardo Carhuapoma
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
Stephan A. Mayer
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Daniel F. Hanley
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore
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Summary

Vascular malformations constitute an important cause of intracranial hemorrhage especially in younger patients. These malformations may arise from any segment of the different functional units of the brain vasculature, including arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins. Among vascular malformations causing intracranial hemorrhage, brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are among the most frequently encountered. Brain AVMs commonly affect distal arterial branches and in roughly half of the cases, the malformation is found in the borderzone region shared by the distal anterior, middle, and/or posterior cerebral arteries. Cerebral angiography may help to differentiate brain AVMs from other types of intracranial anomalies with arterio-venous shunting. Resection of an associated developmental venous anomaly is contraindicated as its occlusion may lead to venous stasis, brain edema, and eventual hemorrhage. A developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is found in up to 30% of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) patients.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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