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Chapter 15 - A Brief History of Testing and Assessment in Oceania

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2022

Sumaya Laher
Affiliation:
University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg
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Summary

Oceania comprises those islands scattered through the Pacific Ocean bounded by Australia and Papua New Guinea to the west, the Hawaiian Islands to the north, New Zealand to the south, and Easter Island to the east. Although there are many cultures and nations in Oceania, psychological assessment as practiced today developed mainly in Australia and New Zealand. The history of testing and assessment in the chapter on Oceania is thus a history of testing and assessment in Australia, in New Zealand, and in the islands that in the twentieth century fell into the sphere of influence of those two countries. The chapter on Oceania seeks to briefly sketch the development of testing and assessment, its successes, and its limitations.

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Print publication year: 2022

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