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10 - Time to Think: Sustainable Development, Future Generations and the Individual

from Promoting the Voice of the Public

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2021

Marie-Claire Cordonier Segger
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Marcel Szabó
Affiliation:
Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Hungary
Alexandra R. Harrington
Affiliation:
Albany Law School
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Summary

Quickly, the term ‘sustainable development’ was spread worldwide and became fashionable. The original objective of the Brundtland Report – to show that developing States could strive for economic development, but were not obliged to sacrifice their environmental assets to that development – was soon set aside. ‘Sustainable development’ was declared to be a political orientation based on three pillars, economic development, social progress and environmental protection. This led first to the suggestion that progress should be achieved in all three sectors, economy, social issues and environmental protection. Economic operators then tried to interpret the concept in the sense that measures in one sector should only be allowed when they satisfied the needs of the other two sectors. In practice, this was aimed at the environmental sector, where protection measures were only possible where they contributed to economic growth and the creation of jobs; in contrast, it was not considered necessary that measures to stimulate economic development – trade agreements, tax reliefs, investment programs and many others – were also beneficial for the environment.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intergenerational Justice in Sustainable Development Treaty Implementation
Advancing Future Generations Rights through National Institutions
, pp. 211 - 224
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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