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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2021

Narve Fulsås
Affiliation:
University of Tromso, Norway
Tore Rem
Affiliation:
Universitetet i Oslo
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Ibsen in Context , pp. 272 - 283
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Primary Sources

Dahl, Per Kristian Heggelund, Streiflys: Fem Ibsen-studier (Oslo: Ibsen-museet, 2001).Google Scholar
de Figueiredo, Ivo, Henrik Ibsen: The Man and the Mask (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2019).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fulsås, Narve and Rem, Tore, Ibsen, Scandinavia and the Making of a World Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).Google Scholar
Gatland, Jan Olav, Repertoaret ved Det Norske Theater 1850–1863 (Bergen: Universitetsbiblioteket i Bergen, 2000).Google Scholar
Haave, Jørgen, Familien Ibsen (Oslo: Museumsforlaget, 2017).Google Scholar
Hemmings, F.W.J., The Theatre Industry in Nineteenth-Century France (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McFarlane, James (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marker, Frederick and Marker, Lise-Lone, The Scandinavian Theatre: A Short History (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1975).Google Scholar
Nygaard, Jon, ‘…af stort est du kommen’: Henrik Ibsen og Skien (Oslo: Centre for Ibsen Studies, 2013).Google Scholar
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Secondary Sources

Beyer, Edvard et al. (eds.), Norsk litteraturkritikks historie 1770–1940, vols. 1 and 2 (Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1990–2).Google Scholar
de Figueiredo, Ivo, Ibsen: The Man and the Mask, trans. Robert, Ferguson (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2019).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, Michael, Ibsen: A Biography (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1985).Google Scholar
Tveterås, Harald L., Den norske bokhandels historie, vol. 1, Forlag og bokhandel inntil 1850 (Oslo: Norsk bokhandler-medhjelper-forening/J. W. Cappelens forlag, 1950).Google Scholar
Aslaksen, Kamilla, ‘Ibsen and Melodrama’, Nordic Theatre Studies 10 (1997), pp. 3552.Google Scholar
Cima, Gay Gibson, ‘Discovering Signs: The Emergence of the Critical Actor in Ibsen’, Theatre Journal 35:1 (1983), pp. 822.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ewbank, Inga-Stina, ‘Ibsen’s Dramatic Language As a Link between His “Realism” and His “Symbolism”’, in Haakonsen, Daniel (ed.), Contemporary Approaches to Ibsen, vol. 1 (Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1965–6).Google Scholar
Holzapfel, Amy, Art, Vision, and Nineteenth-Century Realist Drama: Acts of Seeing (London: Routledge, 2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ibsen, Henrik, Ibsen on Theatre, eds. Frode, Helland and Julie, Holledge with new translations of Henrik Ibsen’s writings by May-Brit, Akerholt (London: Nick Hern Books, 2018).Google Scholar
Johnston, Brian, ‘The Mythic Foundation of Ibsen’s Realism’, Comparative Drama 3:1 (1969), pp. 2741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyons, Charles R., ‘Ibsen’s Realism and the Predicates of Postmodernism’, in Hemmer, Bjørn and Ystad, Vigdis (eds.), Contemporary Approaches to Ibsen, vol. 8 (Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1994).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Rebellato, Dan, ‘Objectivity and Observation’, in Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Theatre and Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), pp. 1225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, George Bernard, The Quintessence of Ibsenism. Now Completed to the Death of Ibsen (London: Constable and Company, Ltd, 1913).Google Scholar
States, Bert O., Great Reckonings in Little Rooms: On the Phenomenology of Theatre (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Templeton, Joan, ‘Genre, Representation, and the Politics of Dramatic Form’, in Bjørby, Pål and Arseth, Asbjørn (eds.), Proceedings: IX International Ibsen Conference, Bergen 5–10 June 2000 (Ørve Ervik: Alvheim & Eide, 2001).Google Scholar
Cima, Gay Gibson, ‘Discovering Signs: The Emergence of the Critical Actor in Ibsen’, Theatre Journal, 35:1 (1983), Aporia: Revision, Representation and Intertextual Theatre, pp. 522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Des Roches, Kay Unruh, ‘Sight and Insight: Stage Pictures in Hedda Gabler’, Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, Fall (1990), pp. 49–68.Google Scholar
Gjervan, Ellen Karoline, ‘Henrik Ibsen’s Two Stage Renderings’, Ibsen Studies 12:2 (2012), pp. 89102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ibsen, Henrik, Ibsen on Theatre, eds. Frode, Helland and Julie, Holledge with new translations of Henrik Ibsen’s writings by May-Brit, Akerholt (London: Nick Hern Books, 2018).Google Scholar
Marker, Frederick J. and Marker, Lise-Lone, Ibsen’s Lively Art: A Performance Study of the Major Plays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).Google Scholar
Northam, John R., Ibsen’s Dramatic Method (London: Faber, 1952).Google Scholar
Northam, John R., Ibsen: A Critical Study (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973)Google Scholar
Schumacher, Claude (ed.), Naturalism and Symbolism in European Theatre 1850–1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).Google Scholar
Sprinchorn, Evert, ‘The Unspoken Text in Hedda Gabler’, Modern Drama 36:3 (1993), 353–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tennant, P.F.D., Ibsen’s Dramatic Technique (Cambridge: Bowes & Bowes, 1948).Google Scholar
Langslet, Lars Roar, Henrik Ibsen, Edvard Munch: To genier møtes / Two Geniuses Meet. Bilingual edition in Norwegian and English, trans. Palmyre, Pierroux (Oslo: Cappelen, 1994).Google Scholar
Meier-Graefe, Julius, Modern Art: Being a Contribution to a New System of Aesthetics, trans. Florence, Simmonds and George, W. Chrystal (2 vols., London: William Heinemannn; New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1908).Google Scholar
Meisel, Martin, Realizations: Narrative, Pictorial, and Theatrical Arts in Nineteenth-Century England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983).Google Scholar
Mohr, Otto Lous, Henrik Ibsen som maler, with an English summary (Oslo: Gyldendal, 1953).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Shepherd-Barr, Kirsten, ‘Ibsen, Munch, and the Relationship between Modernist Theatre and Art’, Nordic Theatre Studies 12 (2000), pp. 4353.Google Scholar
Templeton, Joan, Munch’s Ibsen: A Painter’s Vision of a Playwright (Seattle and Copenhagen: University of Washington Press and Museum Tusculanum Press, 2008).Google Scholar
Christensen, Sofija, ‘Dances in the Drawing Room: Musical Elements in Ibsen’s Dramas’, Nordlit 34 (2015), pp. 105–14.Google Scholar
Grinde, Nils, Ibsen og musikken. Musikken i Henrik Ibsens liv og verker (Oslo: Aschehoug, 2008).Google Scholar
Høgåsen-Hallesby, Hedda, ‘Who are You, Peer? An Anniversary Postlude on Music, Text and Identity Construction’, in Solomon, Thomas (ed.), Music and Identity in Norway and Beyond (Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 2011), pp. 105–30.Google Scholar
Perelli, Franco, ‘Some More Notes about Nora’s Tarantella’, in Sæther, Astrid (ed.), Ibsen and the Arts: Painting – Sculpture – Architecture. Proceedings of the Ibsen Conference in Rome, 2001, 24–27 October (Oslo: Centre for Ibsen Studies, 2002), pp. 119–31.Google Scholar
Todić, Sofia, ‘Ibsen’s Danse Macabre: The Importance of Auditory Elements in Henrik Ibsen’s Drama John Gabriel Borkman’, Musicology 13 (2012), pp. 163–75.Google Scholar
Adorno, Theodor W., Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life, trans. Jephcott, E.F.N (London: Verso, 2010).Google Scholar
Barish, Jonas, The Antitheatrical Prejudice. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Beyer, Harald, Nietzsche og Norden (2 vols., Bergen: Grieg Forlag, 1958–9).Google Scholar
Beyer, Harald. Søren Kierkegaard og Norge (Kristiania: Aschehoug, 1924).Google Scholar
Ewbank, Inga-Stina, ‘Ibsen and Shakespeare: Reading the Silence’, in Ystad, Vigdis (ed.), Ibsen at the Centre for Advanced Study (Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1997), pp. 85104.Google Scholar
Freud, Sigmund, ‘Some Character-Types Met with in Psycho-analytic Work’, in The Penguin Freud Library, vol. 14, Art and Literature, trans. James, Strachey (London: Penguin, 1985).Google Scholar
Gjesdal, Kristin, The Drama of History: Ibsen, Hegel, Nietzsche (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Stewart, Jon, A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark (2 vols., Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel’s Publishers, 2007).Google Scholar
Aarseth, Asbjørn, ‘Ibsen and Darwin: A Reading of The Wild Duck’, Modern Drama 48:1 (2005), pp. 110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, Marvin, ‘Ibsen, Strindberg, and Telegony’, PMLA 100:5 (October 1985), pp. 774–82.Google Scholar
Goodall, Jane R., Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin (London and New York: Routledge, 2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shepherd-Barr, Kirsten E., Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett (New York: Columbia University Press, 2015).Google Scholar
Shideler, Ross, Questioning the Father: From Darwin to Zola, Ibsen, Strindberg, and Hardy (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999).Google Scholar
Wolff, Tamsen, Mendel’s Theatre: Heredity, Eugenics, and Early Twentieth-Century American Drama (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zwart, H.A.E., ‘The Birth of a Research Animal: Ibsen’s The Wild Duck and the Origin of a New Animal Science’, Environmental Values 9 (2000), pp. 93100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barstow, Susan Torrey, ‘“Hedda Is All of Us”: Late-Victorian Women at the Matinee’, Victorian Studies 43: 3 (2001), pp. 387411.Google ScholarPubMed
Diamond, Elin, Unmaking Mimesis: Essays on Feminism and Theater (London and New York: Routledge, 1997).Google Scholar
Finney, Gail, ‘Ibsen and Feminism’, in McFarlane, James (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp. 89105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fulsås, Narve and Rem, Tore, Ibsen, Scandinavia and the Making of a World Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, ‘“I Am Not a Woman Writer”: About Women, Literature and Feminist Theory Today’, Feminist Theory 9:3 (2008), pp. 259–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moi, Toril, ‘Hedda’s Silences: Beauty and Despair in Hedda Gabler’, Modern Drama 56:4 (2013), pp. 434–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Templeton, Joan, Ibsen’s Women (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).Google Scholar
Lisi, Leonardo, ‘Aesthetics of Fragmentation in Henrik Ibsen’s Peer Gynt’, in Marginal Modernity: The Aesthetics of Dependency from Kierkegaard to Joyce (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013).Google Scholar
Marx, Karl, Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, vol. 1 (1867), trans. Ben, Fowkes, intr. Ernest, Mandel (New York: Penguin, 1992).Google Scholar
Moretti, Franco, ‘The Grey Area: Ibsen and the Spirit of Capitalism’, New Left Review 61 (2010), pp. 117–31.Google Scholar
Oxfeldt, Elizabeth, Nordic Orientalism: Paris and the Cosmopolitan Imagination 1800–1900 (Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2005).Google Scholar
Zhulina, Alisa, ‘The Invisible Stage Hand, or Henrik Ibsen’s Theatre of Capital’, Theatre Survey 59:3 (September 2018), pp. 386408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beyer, Edvard et al. (eds.), Norsk litteraturkritikks historie 1770–1940, vols. 1 and 2 (Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1990–2).Google Scholar
de Figueiredo, Ivo, Ibsen: The Man and the Mask, trans. Robert, Ferguson (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2019).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meyer, Michael, Ibsen: A Biography (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1985).Google Scholar
Tveterås, Harald L., Den norske bokhandels historie, vol. 1, Forlag og bokhandel inntil 1850 (Oslo: Norsk bokhandler-medhjelper-forening/J. W. Cappelens forlag, 1950).Google Scholar
Aslaksen, Kamilla, ‘Ibsen and Melodrama’, Nordic Theatre Studies 10 (1997), pp. 3552.Google Scholar
Cima, Gay Gibson, ‘Discovering Signs: The Emergence of the Critical Actor in Ibsen’, Theatre Journal 35:1 (1983), pp. 822.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ewbank, Inga-Stina, ‘Ibsen’s Dramatic Language As a Link between His “Realism” and His “Symbolism”’, in Haakonsen, Daniel (ed.), Contemporary Approaches to Ibsen, vol. 1 (Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1965–6).Google Scholar
Holzapfel, Amy, Art, Vision, and Nineteenth-Century Realist Drama: Acts of Seeing (London: Routledge, 2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ibsen, Henrik, Ibsen on Theatre, eds. Frode, Helland and Julie, Holledge with new translations of Henrik Ibsen’s writings by May-Brit, Akerholt (London: Nick Hern Books, 2018).Google Scholar
Johnston, Brian, ‘The Mythic Foundation of Ibsen’s Realism’, Comparative Drama 3:1 (1969), pp. 2741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyons, Charles R., ‘Ibsen’s Realism and the Predicates of Postmodernism’, in Hemmer, Bjørn and Ystad, Vigdis (eds.), Contemporary Approaches to Ibsen, vol. 8 (Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1994).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Rebellato, Dan, ‘Objectivity and Observation’, in Kirsten Shepherd-Barr (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Theatre and Science (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), pp. 1225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, George Bernard, The Quintessence of Ibsenism. Now Completed to the Death of Ibsen (London: Constable and Company, Ltd, 1913).Google Scholar
States, Bert O., Great Reckonings in Little Rooms: On the Phenomenology of Theatre (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Templeton, Joan, ‘Genre, Representation, and the Politics of Dramatic Form’, in Bjørby, Pål and Arseth, Asbjørn (eds.), Proceedings: IX International Ibsen Conference, Bergen 5–10 June 2000 (Ørve Ervik: Alvheim & Eide, 2001).Google Scholar
Cima, Gay Gibson, ‘Discovering Signs: The Emergence of the Critical Actor in Ibsen’, Theatre Journal, 35:1 (1983), Aporia: Revision, Representation and Intertextual Theatre, pp. 522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Des Roches, Kay Unruh, ‘Sight and Insight: Stage Pictures in Hedda Gabler’, Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism, Fall (1990), pp. 49–68.Google Scholar
Gjervan, Ellen Karoline, ‘Henrik Ibsen’s Two Stage Renderings’, Ibsen Studies 12:2 (2012), pp. 89102CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ibsen, Henrik, Ibsen on Theatre, eds. Frode, Helland and Julie, Holledge with new translations of Henrik Ibsen’s writings by May-Brit, Akerholt (London: Nick Hern Books, 2018).Google Scholar
Marker, Frederick J. and Marker, Lise-Lone, Ibsen’s Lively Art: A Performance Study of the Major Plays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989).Google Scholar
Northam, John R., Ibsen’s Dramatic Method (London: Faber, 1952).Google Scholar
Northam, John R., Ibsen: A Critical Study (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1973)Google Scholar
Schumacher, Claude (ed.), Naturalism and Symbolism in European Theatre 1850–1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).Google Scholar
Sprinchorn, Evert, ‘The Unspoken Text in Hedda Gabler’, Modern Drama 36:3 (1993), 353–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tennant, P.F.D., Ibsen’s Dramatic Technique (Cambridge: Bowes & Bowes, 1948).Google Scholar
Langslet, Lars Roar, Henrik Ibsen, Edvard Munch: To genier møtes / Two Geniuses Meet. Bilingual edition in Norwegian and English, trans. Palmyre, Pierroux (Oslo: Cappelen, 1994).Google Scholar
Meier-Graefe, Julius, Modern Art: Being a Contribution to a New System of Aesthetics, trans. Florence, Simmonds and George, W. Chrystal (2 vols., London: William Heinemannn; New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1908).Google Scholar
Meisel, Martin, Realizations: Narrative, Pictorial, and Theatrical Arts in Nineteenth-Century England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983).Google Scholar
Mohr, Otto Lous, Henrik Ibsen som maler, with an English summary (Oslo: Gyldendal, 1953).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Shepherd-Barr, Kirsten, ‘Ibsen, Munch, and the Relationship between Modernist Theatre and Art’, Nordic Theatre Studies 12 (2000), pp. 4353.Google Scholar
Templeton, Joan, Munch’s Ibsen: A Painter’s Vision of a Playwright (Seattle and Copenhagen: University of Washington Press and Museum Tusculanum Press, 2008).Google Scholar
Christensen, Sofija, ‘Dances in the Drawing Room: Musical Elements in Ibsen’s Dramas’, Nordlit 34 (2015), pp. 105–14.Google Scholar
Grinde, Nils, Ibsen og musikken. Musikken i Henrik Ibsens liv og verker (Oslo: Aschehoug, 2008).Google Scholar
Høgåsen-Hallesby, Hedda, ‘Who are You, Peer? An Anniversary Postlude on Music, Text and Identity Construction’, in Solomon, Thomas (ed.), Music and Identity in Norway and Beyond (Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 2011), pp. 105–30.Google Scholar
Perelli, Franco, ‘Some More Notes about Nora’s Tarantella’, in Sæther, Astrid (ed.), Ibsen and the Arts: Painting – Sculpture – Architecture. Proceedings of the Ibsen Conference in Rome, 2001, 24–27 October (Oslo: Centre for Ibsen Studies, 2002), pp. 119–31.Google Scholar
Todić, Sofia, ‘Ibsen’s Danse Macabre: The Importance of Auditory Elements in Henrik Ibsen’s Drama John Gabriel Borkman’, Musicology 13 (2012), pp. 163–75.Google Scholar
Adorno, Theodor W., Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life, trans. Jephcott, E.F.N (London: Verso, 2010).Google Scholar
Barish, Jonas, The Antitheatrical Prejudice. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Beyer, Harald, Nietzsche og Norden (2 vols., Bergen: Grieg Forlag, 1958–9).Google Scholar
Beyer, Harald. Søren Kierkegaard og Norge (Kristiania: Aschehoug, 1924).Google Scholar
Ewbank, Inga-Stina, ‘Ibsen and Shakespeare: Reading the Silence’, in Ystad, Vigdis (ed.), Ibsen at the Centre for Advanced Study (Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1997), pp. 85104.Google Scholar
Freud, Sigmund, ‘Some Character-Types Met with in Psycho-analytic Work’, in The Penguin Freud Library, vol. 14, Art and Literature, trans. James, Strachey (London: Penguin, 1985).Google Scholar
Gjesdal, Kristin, The Drama of History: Ibsen, Hegel, Nietzsche (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Stewart, Jon, A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark (2 vols., Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel’s Publishers, 2007).Google Scholar
Aarseth, Asbjørn, ‘Ibsen and Darwin: A Reading of The Wild Duck’, Modern Drama 48:1 (2005), pp. 110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlson, Marvin, ‘Ibsen, Strindberg, and Telegony’, PMLA 100:5 (October 1985), pp. 774–82.Google Scholar
Goodall, Jane R., Performance and Evolution in the Age of Darwin (London and New York: Routledge, 2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shepherd-Barr, Kirsten E., Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett (New York: Columbia University Press, 2015).Google Scholar
Shideler, Ross, Questioning the Father: From Darwin to Zola, Ibsen, Strindberg, and Hardy (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999).Google Scholar
Wolff, Tamsen, Mendel’s Theatre: Heredity, Eugenics, and Early Twentieth-Century American Drama (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zwart, H.A.E., ‘The Birth of a Research Animal: Ibsen’s The Wild Duck and the Origin of a New Animal Science’, Environmental Values 9 (2000), pp. 93100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barstow, Susan Torrey, ‘“Hedda Is All of Us”: Late-Victorian Women at the Matinee’, Victorian Studies 43: 3 (2001), pp. 387411.Google ScholarPubMed
Diamond, Elin, Unmaking Mimesis: Essays on Feminism and Theater (London and New York: Routledge, 1997).Google Scholar
Finney, Gail, ‘Ibsen and Feminism’, in McFarlane, James (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ibsen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp. 89105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fulsås, Narve and Rem, Tore, Ibsen, Scandinavia and the Making of a World Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, Henrik Ibsen and the Birth of Modernism: Art, Theater, Philosophy (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006).Google Scholar
Moi, Toril, ‘“I Am Not a Woman Writer”: About Women, Literature and Feminist Theory Today’, Feminist Theory 9:3 (2008), pp. 259–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moi, Toril, ‘Hedda’s Silences: Beauty and Despair in Hedda Gabler’, Modern Drama 56:4 (2013), pp. 434–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Templeton, Joan, Ibsen’s Women (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).Google Scholar
Lisi, Leonardo, ‘Aesthetics of Fragmentation in Henrik Ibsen’s Peer Gynt’, in Marginal Modernity: The Aesthetics of Dependency from Kierkegaard to Joyce (New York: Fordham University Press, 2013).Google Scholar
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