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Conclusion

Naturalism and Normativity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2018

Arash Abizadeh
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
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Summary

Returning to the metaethical question of the nature of normativity, this chapter concludes that for Hobbes normative properties are not real properties—they do not have causal standing—but are nevertheless the object of truth-apt, epistemically objective propositions. Because foundationally normative principles do not specify real, causally efficacious properties, their truth cannot be discovered via perception; rather, they are self-evidently known insofar as humans could not conceive themselves as reasoning agents and persons without also conceiving themselves to have normative reasons of the kind specified by those normative precepts. If Hobbes is a founder of naturalism in ethics, then he must be seen as an especially sophisticated kind: one who acknowledged normative truths and properties irreducible to non-normative natural ones.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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  • Conclusion
  • Arash Abizadeh, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics
  • Online publication: 18 October 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108277310.010
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  • Conclusion
  • Arash Abizadeh, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics
  • Online publication: 18 October 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108277310.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Arash Abizadeh, McGill University, Montréal
  • Book: Hobbes and the Two Faces of Ethics
  • Online publication: 18 October 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108277310.010
Available formats
×