Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7c2ld Total loading time: 0.33 Render date: 2021-11-28T13:18:00.856Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Concluding remarks: corruption, anti-corruption, and the 2007 elections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Toyin Falola
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Matthew M. Heaton
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

On May 29, 2007, Olusegun Obasanjo stepped down as president of Nigeria, having served the maximum two terms allowed under the constitution. Alhaji Umaru Yar'Adua, the brother of Obasanjo's deputy head of state in the 1970s, was inaugurated as the new president of Nigeria, marking the first time in Nigeria's history that power was transferred from one civilian ruler to another. The PDP extended its domination of political offices throughout the country, controlling both federal houses as well as the governorships and state legislatures in twenty-eight of the thirty-six states of the federation.

The 2007 elections highlighted several of the internal contradictions of Nigerian politics as they relate to the issue of political corruption. On the surface, the transfer of power to Yar'Adua served as an indication of the potential for stability and longevity of democratic, civilian rule in the Fourth Republic. The lead-up to the elections saw an unprecedented crackdown on corruption in the country. The federal anti-corruption body, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, along with various state legislatures, brought charges against many powerful politicians. The elections, which took place for local and state offices on April 14 and for federal offices on April 21, were conducted with a minimum of violence. All these factors are encouraging, and they illustrate the extent to which the Fourth Republic has been able to accomplish things that other civilian regimes have not.

Type
Chapter
Information
A History of Nigeria , pp. 271 - 279
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×