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Book contents

Chapter 65 - Perineal Repair and Pelvic Floor Injury (Content last reviewed: 20th February 2020)

from Section 6 - Late Prenatal – Obstetric Problems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2017

David James
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Philip Steer
Affiliation:
Imperial College London
Carl Weiner
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Bernard Gonik
Affiliation:
Wayne State University, Detroit
Stephen Robson
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle
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Summary

The need for perineal repair after childbirth affects millions of women worldwide. In the United Kingdom, approximately 85% of women sustain some form of perineal trauma during vaginal delivery, and 69% of these will require stitches.

Type
Chapter
Information
High-Risk Pregnancy
Management Options
, pp. 1842 - 1865
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
First published in: 2017

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References

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