Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-swqlm Total loading time: 0.244 Render date: 2021-11-30T04:32:05.730Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

11 - Network MIMO techniques

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2013

Gan Zheng
Affiliation:
University of Luxembourg
Yongming Huang
Affiliation:
Southeast University
Kai-Kit Wong
Affiliation:
University College London
Xiaoli Chu
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield
David Lopez-Perez
Affiliation:
Bell Labs, Alcatel-Lucent
Yang Yang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology
Fredrik Gunnarsson
Affiliation:
Ericsson Research, Linköping, Sweden
Get access

Summary

Introduction

As the demand for high-rate wireless services increases, new techniques and architectures have emerged to increase their spectral efficiency and improve their reliability. During the last decade, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) or multiple-antenna technology has attracted much attention due to its ability to provide fast and reliable transmission without bandwidth expansion or increase in transmit power. For point-to-point MIMO systems, it has been shown that the capacity of an MIMO channel grows linearly with the minimum number of antennas at both ends [1]. For multi-user systems, MIMO can support space-division multiple access (SDMA) and provide multi-user diversity gain. MIMO has been a key to most modern wireless communication standards such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) and LTE-Advanced, Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) and IEEE 802.11n Wireless Fidelity (WiFi).

While the original LTE mainly considered capacity, heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs), where macrocells are overlaid with low-power nodes (LPNs) such as picocells, femtocells, and relay nodes, have attracted lots of interest in LTE-Advanced to meet the explosive but unequal mobile data traffic demands. On the other hand, due to the scarcity of spectrum, full frequency reuse has been an attractive strategy considered in LTE-Advanced [2]. In conventional homogeneous macrocell cellular networks operating under the principle of single-cell processing (SCP), there is strong intercell interference (ICI), which can be treated as noise and becomes the major challenge that limits system performance in terms of both throughput and fairness. In particular, user equipments (UEs) at the cell edges suffer the most from ICI.

Type
Chapter
Information
Heterogeneous Cellular Networks
Theory, Simulation and Deployment
, pp. 312 - 351
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
5
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×