Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-ndjvl Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2022-05-17T14:24:13.059Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

10 - New directions in Hegel's philosophy of nature

John Burbidge
Affiliation:
Trent University
Katerina Deligiorgi
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Get access

Summary

If any part of Hegel's philosophy is dated, lacking relevance to the modern world, it is his philosophy of nature. In developing its argument, and when lecturing on its various paragraphs, he refers to the science of his time. Because physics, chemistry, geology and biology have all made giant strides since then, however, the confident claims of 1830 now look rather like superstitious misunderstandings.

Indeed, Karl Popper, relying on Hegel's dissertation of 1801, claims that in his own day Hegel ignored the most recent discoveries of science, confidently arguing that there was no planet between Mars and Jupiter, even after the then classified as a planet Ceres had been discovered. As well, “Hegel's bombastic and mystifying cant” is so pretentious and full of fancies that it need never be taken seriously (see Popper 1966: 27–9).

Not surprisingly, this part of Hegel's philosophy has been little read and studied over the past two centuries. It was not translated into English until 1970, although it then appeared in two forms, in Arnold Miller's Hegel's Philosophy of Nature (1970) and in Michael J. Petry's three-volume edition of the same name (1970). Petry, however, did more. In his notes he cited the scientific texts and journals of Hegel's time, showing that Hegel was aware of contemporary theories and experimentation, and incorporated their results into his text and lectures. Far from presuming to tell nature what it should be like, we discovered, Hegel was interested in the most recent discoveries scientists had made.

Type
Chapter
Information
Hegel
New Directions
, pp. 177 - 192
Publisher: Acumen Publishing
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×