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Chapter 7 - Contraception

from Section 2 - Sexuality

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 December 2009

Jo Ann Rosenfeld
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
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Summary

Contraception is an inherent part of good health care for women. Emergency contraception (EC) is birth control used to prevent pregnancy after known or suspected failure of contraception or unprotected intercourse, including sexual assault. Women who use EC should be given additional opportunities to consider whether a more permanent or better method of contraception is warranted. Once adolescents have had a sexual experience, they may be even more open to reconsidering abstinence and should be encouraged to consider abstinence as a potential choice. Certain types of condoms provide some protection against sexually transmitted infections. Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are hormonal methods of birth control. For most women, pregnancy and/or abortion are associated with a greater risk of mortality and morbidity than oral contraceptives. Male sterilization is the most cost-effective contraceptive method, with a failure rate of 0.1 to 4%. Many circumstances affect a woman's access to contraception.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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  • Contraception
  • Edited by Jo Ann Rosenfeld, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Book: Handbook of Women's Health
  • Online publication: 26 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642111.007
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  • Contraception
  • Edited by Jo Ann Rosenfeld, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Book: Handbook of Women's Health
  • Online publication: 26 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642111.007
Available formats
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Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Contraception
  • Edited by Jo Ann Rosenfeld, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Book: Handbook of Women's Health
  • Online publication: 26 December 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511642111.007
Available formats
×