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Chapter 9 - Researching Readiness for Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice

A Comprehensive Review of the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS)

from Part III - Preparing for Effective Implementation:

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2012

Barbara Kelly
Affiliation:
University of Strathclyde
Daniel F. Perkins
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University
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Summary

Attitudes toward innovation can be a facilitating or limiting factor in the dissemination and implementation of new technologies. Several demographic and professional characteristics of providers have been found to be related to attitudes toward evidence-based practice, as measured by the evidence-based practice attitude scale (EBPAS). Organizational culture and climate both have been found to be related to providers' attitudes toward evidence-based practice. Positive climate measured by the organizational readiness for change scale was negatively related to divergence scores on the EBPAS and demoralizing or negative organizational climate has been found to be positively related to divergence scores. Leadership behaviors in an organization, specifically transformational and transactional leadership, have been related to attitudes toward evidence-based practice. Transactional leadership was positively associated with the openness subscale and marginally positively associated with the requirements subscale.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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