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21 - Theory of Stream Power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

Whenever there is flow of water in an alluvial channel, the water entrains and transports sediment. The entrainment and transport of sediment require work that flow must perform, and to perform the work requires energy. The water has potential energy due to elevation, which is transformed to kinetic energy part of which is utilized to do this work and part is dissipated to overcome boundary and bed friction. The time rate of potential energy expenditure is the stream power, which plays a fundamental role in the evolution of a fluvial system. Using the theory of stream power, this chapter derives constraints for hydraulic geometry.

Type
Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 510 - 528
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Theory of Stream Power
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.022
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  • Theory of Stream Power
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.022
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Theory of Stream Power
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.022
Available formats
×