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5 - Theory of Minimum Variance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

The concept of minimum variance is a statistical concept, and its premise is that a river tends to minimize the variability of factors that govern its hydraulic geometry. This concept has been applied in different ways and this chapter discusses the theory of minimum variance from different viewpoints.

Type
Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 159 - 185
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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