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18 - Theory of Minimum Energy Dissipation Rate

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

A river constantly adjusts its geometry and morphology in response to the water and sediment load it receives from its watershed and to human activities, such as straightening, dredging, cutoff, levee construction, restoration, and diversion. The adjustment requires dissipation of energy. When the energy dissipation reaches a minimum rate the river tends to reach equilibrium. This chapter discusses the theory of minimum energy dissipation rate for deriving the hydraulic geometry when the river is in equilibrium state.

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Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 450 - 469
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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