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16 - Maximum Flow Efficiency Hypothesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

Design of a stable alluvial channel is based on the hypothesis that the equilibrium state of a channel corresponds to maximum flow. The channel design can then be accomplished by employing the continuity equation, resistance law, sediment transport equation, and the channel cross-section shape. This chapter derives the channel hydraulic geometry for primarily three cross-sections, namely trapezoidal, rectangular, and triangular.

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Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 419 - 435
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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