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2 - Governing Equations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

Physically based approaches to hydraulic geometry relations for width, depth, velocity, and slope require equations of continuity of water, roughness, and sediment transport. Different methods have been employed for different expressions of roughness and sediment transport. Without delving into their underlying theories, this chapter briefly outlines these expressions as they will be invoked in subsequent chapters. Also, unit stream power, stream power as well as entropy have been employed, which are also briefly discussed.

Type
Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 30 - 64
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Governing Equations
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.003
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  • Governing Equations
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.003
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Governing Equations
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.003
Available formats
×